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  • Keep practicing?

    I am somewhat worried that my heartrate is going too high during kendo practice. A couple of years ago in gym class it nearly reached 200 and the teacher made me sit down and rest. I get more tired in kendo now than I did when the teacher made me stop. Any ideas how to see if it is too high? What to do if it is?

  • #2
    You should prob talk to a doctor man ,

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    • #3
      Heartrates are highly individual..if you are 20 years old as your profile says, then it's about the average max for your age (A common used *very* rough rule of thumb is Max Heartrate = 220-age)
      At that age, theres nothing wrong with pushing up towards max..it's more when you're approaching 40, with high bloodpressure and potential heart problems

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      • #4
        You should still see a doctor, but isn't it the case that the more exercise and being in shape you are, the less strain it will feel on your body so your heart rate won't go so high? Maybe you should start some cross training to help get you in shape so the heart rate doesn't scare you so much.

        Please keep in mind I am no claiming that you are out of shape, as I have no clue, but does this seem to make sense?

        Also, if you focus on being as efficient as possible in kendo, won't it be less of a strain on your body. Like relaxing instead of being tense and all the proper form stuff. Try and think if you do unnecessary action and see if you can cut down on that. Maybe you are working too hard at practice and need to be more efficient with how you use your body... (I don't mean be lazy, you are working too hard, just be efficient, I hope that makes sense)

        Just some thoughts.
        Last edited by nodachi; 19th February 2004, 11:11 PM.

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        • #5
          When working out, your heart rate should be reaching the max, or your not working hard enough. But Kendo is a bit differnt as it's mainly technique work. Haya-suburi is the only thing I can think of that would make your heart max out, but if it's something else, it might be something a doctor could answer.

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          • #6
            Well, I could see it happening in kakarigeiko too. My heartrate race too, but generally, I try to tone down the exercise slightly, and continue as much as I can. Generally this'll build cardiovascular endurance, which is probably what's needed.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tweetyness
              I am somewhat worried that my heartrate is going too high during kendo practice. A couple of years ago in gym class it nearly reached 200 and the teacher made me sit down and rest. I get more tired in kendo now than I did when the teacher made me stop. Any ideas how to see if it is too high? What to do if it is?
              Do you have some heart rate monitor you wear during practices?
              If you are about to pass out and throw up, then you may want to stop.
              Depends on your medical history and what your doctor recommends.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Arnold Strong
                When working out, your heart rate should be reaching the max, or your not working hard enough.

                Isn't there such a thing as training too hard? Hence all those posters on walls and equipment about working at your target heart rate. There's research on all this stuff. You get the maximum benefit from working at that target heart rate, or so I've been taught. Sometimes "less is more". If you always train at your maximum heart rate you will burn out. Eventually the body will crap out, whether it be the heart when you get old or the muscles as they can't handle that much stress 100% of the time.

                Not trying to contradict, maybe this is just a difference in training philosophies/strategies. To each his own...

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                • #9
                  Are you eating properly?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nodachi
                    Isn't there such a thing as training too hard? Hence all those posters on walls and equipment about working at your target heart rate. There's research on all this stuff. You get the maximum benefit from working at that target heart rate, or so I've been taught. Sometimes "less is more". If you always train at your maximum heart rate you will burn out. Eventually the body will crap out, whether it be the heart when you get old or the muscles as they can't handle that much stress 100% of the time.

                    Not trying to contradict, maybe this is just a difference in training philosophies/strategies. To each his own...
                    Depends on what you are training for. You can't 'train at max HR'. Your body simply can't produce enough energy to do it for any sustained amount of time, so it will always happen in short burst (ie kakarigeiko).
                    For general endurance training, it's recommened to do the bulk of the training between 65%-75% of Max HR. As long as you have enough stored energy, you can do this for hours and is recommended as the best 'fatburning' range. It's also used to build up a base fitness level.
                    Last time I tested my max HR (on a bike), I reached 192 and could probably have squeesed a little more out...there's nothing wrong with reaching a HR of 200 at the age of 20.

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                    • #11
                      Sometimes "less is more". If you always train at your maximum heart rate you will burn out. Eventually the body will crap out, whether it be the heart when you get old or the muscles as they can't handle that much stress 100% of the time.
                      Don't stay at your max heart rate throughout your entire workout. Doing that would be suicide. But what I meant was that at sometime during your workout, you should hit your max and then it should lower to a bit above your normal rate and then back up again.

                      Well, I could see it happening in kakarigeiko too
                      That is tiring, but to have your heart rate race up to 200? That might be a bit excessive. Unless you're talking about doing kakarigeiko for a long period of time, I can probably understand.

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                      • #12
                        With a heart rate of 200 for extended periods of time, sure you are putting a ton of stress on your body but at 20 it will not kill you. The problem will come in where you sit down to rest....

                        The bulk of super fit athletes that have heart attacks during training suffer these as their heart rate returns to normal. Think about a Tour De France Bike rider, their resting heart rate is about 40 and sometimes below. They are able to push their heart rate way up when necessary and maintain it, but when they stop exercising, their heart tries to return to 40 BPM as fast as possible, and this leads to lack of pressure and hence, heart failure.

                        In Kendo I don't think you will maintain a high heart rate for extended periods, in fact you will almost be doing interval training which is actually very good for fitness and fat loss. You are also not in the situation like a bike our mountain climb where your body will have to push forward, if it starts to burn out, you will not be able to ignore the signs.

                        If you do feel a little off, don't just stop doing what you are doing, slow your pace, walk around quietly and let your body return to idle slowly.

                        I agree with all the other posts... see a doc just to make sure the ticker is in good working order. You would not want to have to give up Kendo because it isn't and you were stupid about it.

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