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  • Tachi Giri Keiko

    What is this apparently violent thing I keep hearing about? People keep mentioning it around me, and apparently it involves foot sweeps and grappling?

    When is this done? How widespread is it?

  • #2
    Tachigiri-geiko or tachikiri-keiko (rendaku, the feature in Japanese were a 'k' turns into a 'g' or an 'h' into a 'b' or 'p' when it comes in the middle of a compound word, may depend on local dialect) is basically a keiko where the motodatchi fights a number of opponents consecutively with no breaks. Formats vary (length of time, how much roughness is allowed, etc.). The most famous one to appear on the internet is the one in Aomori where the motodachi takes on 36 opponents with a fixed time for each bout. The clock gets stop in between bouts and if someone, usually the poor motodachi, gets knocked over so usually all in all adding up to about 3 hours total. Here is an article about it:

    http://kenshi247.net/blog/2010/06/07/tachikiri/

    You might encounter it in a club where someone is leaving and so as a going away present he/she gets to fight everyone in a row one last time. Tachikiri could also be a birthday present in some clubs. This would turn out generally shorter as each bout ends at ippon rather than a set time.

    It's not about unusual techniques like leg sweeps (though they may get used in some versions), it's about endurance and getting to a point where you no longer can fight with physical strength.
    Last edited by dillon; 12th March 2012, 10:13 AM.

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    • #3
      We do this in our club when someone leaves - they fight everyone in the club, starting with beginners, ending with sensei. We throw out the usual rules, so you may see sweeps, hip tosses, tsuki into the wall, etc depending on the person receiving. The level of roughness is geared towards the level of the person.

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      • #4
        That sounds fun!

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        • #5
          I gotta get some more coffee.... I read that thread title as 'tachi GIRL keiko'

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill View Post
            We do this in our club when someone leaves - they fight everyone in the club, starting with beginners, ending with sensei. We throw out the usual rules, so you may see sweeps, hip tosses, tsuki into the wall, etc depending on the person receiving. The level of roughness is geared towards the level of the person.
            Hip tosses on a wooden floor? What is the injury risk for something like that?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Missingno. View Post
              Hip tosses on a wooden floor? What is the injury risk for something like that?
              Well, the few times I have done it I have let the guy down pretty easy. One year we had a university student who'd been with us for a couple of years. Young, tough, good skills, Japanese - he went through the wringer. Not only that, but once he was done he asked to go through the gauntlet again. Even without the sweeps and whatnot it's a tough practice - we instruct each person to go all-out, when your time is up you should be exhausted, and the other guy has to keep going.

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              • #8
                My club does this (without the leg sweeps and throws) as a hazing exercise when ever there is something to celebrate. We recently had two guys pass their Nidan grades and a birthday and all three were on the receiving end. I've been told it helps improve fighting sprit and helps you all gell as a club.

                I've taken my birthday off Facebook, just to be on the safe side

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                • #9
                  I had go through that sort of gauntlet thing right before I moved away... except I was an intermediate not yet in full bogu, so it wasn't as tough on me as it was on the other guy. :P

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Missingno. View Post
                    Hip tosses on a wooden floor? What is the injury risk for something like that?
                    That's the problem with the youth of today, nobody knows how to do a full judo/aikido roll across a wooden floor wearing full armor anymore. Not very hard really, and even more fun when you come out of the roll and right back at aite.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by R Stroud View Post
                      That's the problem with the youth of today, nobody knows how to do a full judo/aikido roll across a wooden floor wearing full armor anymore. Not very hard really, and even more fun when you come out of the roll and right back at aite.
                      If it's a nice aikido-style projecting throw that's fine, but if it's more of a judo-style "watch him bounce" throw, not so much fun.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dillon View Post
                        basically a keiko where the motodatchi fights a number of opponents consecutively with no breaks
                        For a brief moment I thought you were describing a keiko in which the motodachi fights multiple opponents at once, rather than in consecutive turns.

                        My mind was blown.

                        It is still pretty much blown when I think about 36 consecutive opponents.


                        Originally posted by tango View Post
                        I gotta get some more coffee.... I read that thread title as 'tachi GIRL keiko'
                        I did as well. I was excited for a thread about extra roughness from Kendo girls.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by UnimportantHero View Post
                          It is still pretty much blown when I think about 36 consecutive opponents.
                          The answer is simple, don't leave, or if you do sneak away at night and don't tell anyone.

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                          • #14
                            I hope to experience this when I move later this year.

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                            • #15
                              We have a volunteer :-D

                              Originally posted by KendoN0ob View Post
                              That sounds fun!

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