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  • #16
    I am actually very sensitive to caffeine even though I normally drink coffee quite a bit during the week. However, I only drink one cup of coffee at around 6-7 AM in the morning of a day that I'm doing kendo, and don't drink any more coffee or caffeine during the day when I practice in the evening. If I drink any more coffee or consume any caffeine during the rest of the day my stamina goes way way down. I do eat an orange around 3 PM, and half of a Cliff bar, then the rest of the Cliff bar after practice before the drive home at around 9:45 PM.

    Unfortunately, there aren't that many (legal) ways to increase stamina that I know of through drinks or supplements, and personally I've found that caffeine on kendo days hinders me more than helps me, where stamina is concerned.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by enkorat View Post
      I am actually very sensitive to caffeine even though I normally drink coffee quite a bit during the week. However, I only drink one cup of coffee at around 6-7 AM in the morning of a day that I'm doing kendo, and don't drink any more coffee or caffeine during the day when I practice in the evening. If I drink any more coffee or consume any caffeine during the rest of the day my stamina goes way way down. I do eat an orange around 3 PM, and half of a Cliff bar, then the rest of the Cliff bar after practice before the drive home at around 9:45 PM.

      Unfortunately, there aren't that many (legal) ways to increase stamina that I know of through drinks or supplements, and personally I've found that caffeine on kendo days hinders me more than helps me, where stamina is concerned.
      thanks for your experiences!!! - it does take many peoples views to see where im going wrong and what i can do to improve my basics. stamina is a huge part of kendo especially during the summer months.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by neanderthal View Post
        thanks for your experiences!!! - it does take many peoples views to see where im going wrong and what i can do to improve my basics. stamina is a huge part of kendo especially during the summer months.
        What is your current weekly exercise program? eg.
        Mon:
        Tue:
        Wed:
        Thu:
        Fri:
        Sat:
        Sun:


        If your stamina is affected by health problems than you need to consult a professional about an appropriate exercise program, but we could suggest something extremely light in the meantime which will help you build up.

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        • #19
          Don't forget Rice! Rice 4 hours before training helps a lot in maintaining muscle endurance...Red bulls and a ton of sugar wont get you through a long tough practice...especially if your heart rate is high(will burn up simple carbs fast). Rice 2 to 4 hours before training on kendo days and then fruits & a gatorade 30 mins before training...This seems to help survive gruelling training sessions doing lots of Kakarigeiko, somewhere over a hundred uchikomi, and many rounds of jigeiko without taking a break. The rice or noodles(if you prefer) will supply you with energy throughout your workout.

          i cross train with hitting dummy & jogging no more than 15 a night(2 mins fast pace, 1 min of brisk walking).

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          • #20
            What you're doing by eating rice/noodles is a form of carbo loading, which will top off the glycogen stored in your muscles and liver. You have about 2 to 2 1/2 hours worth of glycogen on board when properly topped off. If your heart rate goes above what is called the lactate threshold (LT), then your preferred source of fuel will be glycogen. LT is somewhere around 80% of your maximum heart rate. A byproduct of burning glycogen is lactate, which causes the "burning" sensation in your muscles when you go really hard. If you've ever "bonked" or "hit the wall" on a long run, that's usually when you've depleted your stored glycogen.

            One of the primary effects of training hard is that it gradually pushes your LT up, which means you can go harder and harder without tapping into your glycogen (and keep burning fat as a fuel instead). This is one of the things that increases your stamina.

            Unless your keiko is longer than about 2 to 2 1/2 hours, you should in theory have enough glycogen on board (assuming you're properly topped off) to carry you through the session. You can fuel a hard session with sugary stuff, but the body can only digest about 200-300 calories an hour when you're going hard because blood is shunted away from the gut to the muscles. So in terms of kendo, your best nutritional strategy is to top off your glycogen stores way before keiko. Any sugary stuff you ingest beyond the mid-point of your keiko won't get digested in time to be of much use to you.

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            • #21
              On a quick note, as a add on to what Paul said. As a diabetic the best thing I have found for quick sugar (to keep from crashing, NOT to increase stamina) is honey. Honey has a huge amount of glucose as simple glucose and passes right through the gut very quickly. In fact studies show (I'll have to go back and try to find the refs if anyone is interested) that glucose from honey begins to be absorbed into the blood through epithelial cell uptake and excretion lining the digestive tract even before it hits the stomach. They sell honey in 'straws' at many places and it is a good quick sugar boost for diabetics when their blood sugar drops rapidly. Every diabetic needs to become in tune with their body and know their limits. By pressing the limits of blood sugar you begin to lose control of your ability to do anything about it and in fact many diabetics when their blood sugar drops below a certain threshold become combative about eating anything too raise their blood sugar. So as a diabetic make sure you keep a blood test with you at all times and explain to your dojo mates and sensei that you are diabetic. Often times the people around you will see your behavior change and realize your blood sugar is too low before you do yourself.

              I know that is a little off topic, but it is important to anyone that is a diabetic type 1 or type 2.

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              • #22
                Speaking of nutrition, if you're at a gasshuku-type training camp where you are practicing intensely multiple times a day, you can do yourself a huge favor by refueling within that golden nutritional window of about an hour after each workout. That's when the body's hormones are primed to convert the food you eat to replenish glycogen stores. I can't quite recall the details, but there was a study on cyclists, split into two groups. Both groups worked out at the same intensity, then one group ate a certain number of calories shortly after the workout, the other group ate the same number of calories, spread out over many hours. The following morning, both groups worked out again. And the group that had eaten immediately after their first workout took longer to reach exhaustion.

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                • #23
                  I follow a paleo diet (meat, vegetables, and sugars only from fruit - occasional fasting, and no refined sugars). It's done wonders for my energy levels and I feel great. I'm no nutritionist and I consulted my doctor about this before going on the plan. You may want to consider that as an option.

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                  • #24
                    A friend at my job, who is a Nutritionist, told me about the rice or noodles. I told him my legs were drained after suriashi part of training. He also gave me a great post workout diet too.

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                    • #25
                      WOW!!! you guys are great!!! so much useful information and the exact opposite to what i have been doing. but close to what i used to do a few years back when stamina wasnt a problem. so i can see the sense in it all. coincidently i do have a training camp coming up next month but from last year we get well fed so i have no worries there.
                      as for the diabetes my wife is always observing as my kids practice too. she can tell my off signs. also my teachers know but i dont have confidence in them if i were to hit the floor. but my bag always has glucose tablets as an emergency.
                      i thank you all for your time, effort and excellent advice. this may just be what pushes me forward to that 2 dan. but if not better quality practice sessions will be the true blessing. Thak you all!!!!

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                      • #26
                        You may also want to search other forums related to endurance sports (running / cycling / triathlon).

                        Here's a start: cycling and type 2 diabetes

                        Good luck.

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                        • #27
                          Excuse me for necroposting, but there's been a recent development and the first thing I thought about was this thread.

                          Intensive Weight Loss Programs Might Help Reverse Diabetes

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