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  • Toe pain from fumikomi

    I've been training about four months now. Recently, we've been training heavily on fumikomi. The last few practices, the toes on my left foot have been in extreme pain. The effected toes are pinky, 4th and middle. Is this common or a problem with my fumikomi?

  • #2
    Originally posted by coronzon View Post
    The last few practices, the toes on my left foot have been in extreme pain.
    Usually you do fumikomi (stump) with your right foot, not left.
    So the problem may be the leaping out you do with the left foot.
    Maybe the floor is rough and your feet have not got used to it yet.
    Try using some foot cream before and after training.

    You may also wear a foot protector. Not all the time but on some practises,
    just to relieve the pain.
    The skin on your feet has to get thicker in the right places.

    I have not had the exact problem like yours but I guess every kendoka
    has to take care of feet from time to time, especially during training
    camps or after an especially virogous training.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by krys View Post
      Usually you do fumikomi (stump) with your right foot, not left.
      So the problem may be the leaping out you do with the left foot.
      Maybe the floor is rough and your feet have not got used to it yet.
      Try using some foot cream before and after training.

      You may also wear a foot protector. Not all the time but on some practises,
      just to relieve the pain.
      The skin on your feet has to get thicker in the right places.

      I have not had the exact problem like yours but I guess every kendoka
      has to take care of feet from time to time, especially during training
      camps or after an especially virogous training.
      Krys,

      Thanks for the response. I believe you are correct about the jumping off part. The right foot slapping the floor causes no real pain. The pain seems to be from the joints of the aforementioned toes. I plan to have a healthcare provider examine this but wanted to know if anyone has experienced this before. I may be leaping too far. Sensei says it looks good, aside from my occasionally leaning into the strike(may also be a culprit)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by krys View Post
        Usually you do fumikomi (stump) with your right foot, not left.
        So the problem may be the leaping out you do with the left foot.
        Maybe the floor is rough and your feet have not got used to it yet.
        Try using some foot cream before and after training.

        You may also wear a foot protector. Not all the time but on some practises,
        just to relieve the pain.
        The skin on your feet has to get thicker in the right places.

        I have not had the exact problem like yours but I guess every kendoka
        has to take care of feet from time to time, especially during training
        camps or after an especially virogous training.
        Krys,

        Thanks for the response. I believe you are correct about the jumping off part. The right foot slapping the floor causes no real pain. The pain seems to be from the joints of the aforementioned toes. I plan to have a healthcare provider examine this but wanted to know if anyone has experienced this before. I may be leaping too far. Sensei says it looks good, aside from my occasionally leaning into the strike(may also be a culprit)

        Comment


        • #5
          Hm. Ask your sensei or a more senior person to look at your footwork and tell them about your toe pain. But it sounds to me like you are pushing off by rolling up onto your toes and using your toe muscles too much. You should be pushing with the back of your leg and hip mucles and your core, not rolling off the little muscles in your toes and foot.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jjcruiser View Post
            Hm. Ask your sensei or a more senior person to look at your footwork and tell them about your toe pain. But it sounds to me like you are pushing off by rolling up onto your toes and using your toe muscles too much. You should be pushing with the back of your leg and hip mucles and your core, not rolling off the little muscles in your toes and foot.
            JJ,

            Thanks for the response. I believe you hit the nail on the head. I'll talk to the sensei and try to be more cognizant of which muscle groups I'm using when pushing off.

            Comment


            • #7
              Ok, the pain I thought was in my toes was actually radiating from the ball of my foot. I figured it out after icing. I'll go see a podiatrist to get a diagnosis.

              Comment


              • #8
                There is a very high chance that your arches have fallen. If you are not getting blisters on the bottom of the thumb of your feet, but rather around the ball of your feet, the chances are even higher your arches have fallen or have always been that way.

                If this is the case the best you can do is to get insoles made for you. This does not guarantee that your arches will come back to its normal "height". But it will make your feet a lot more comfortable when you walk, if your arches have fallen.

                The common reason to fallen arches is too much traumatic stress (ie jumping around bare footed ala kendo) , over weight, lifting too much heavy stuff (bent over rows, tough man competition, etc etc)

                As for kendo, stay off the choyaku men. In essence, choyakumen is the equivalent of doing fumikomi for EVERY SINGLE swing. If you do 100 choyakumen, that means you essentially did 100 uchikomi.

                Meanwhile you can do excercises to make your arches develop. crumpling a paper into a ball just using your toes is one excercies. Another is moving forward only using your toes.

                In any case if you havent gone to the doctor, go. It's not going to get better. At the very worst you might end up needing steroid / cortisone shots.

                Comment


                • #9
                  It might be because you're raising your left foot too high which puts more stress on your toes. I had same problem when I was a beginner, but it stopped once I adjusted how high I was keeping my left foot and pushing from it. Hope that makes sense.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I did talk to my sensei and see a physician. Sensei stated the location of the pain is not abnormal, the intensity of the pain was troubling. Asked me how much I trained fumikomi and/or haya suburi outside the dojo. Truth is, I practice both as much as possible while at home and/or work. (You can imagine the looks I get). Usually about 2-3 hours a day just on these exercises...too much retorted the sensei.

                    The physician said the same thing. I have recently begun practicing a martial art which utilizes muscles/tendons that are not used to so much activity. We found a slight strain. Backed off practicing this and just did seiza suburis for the remainder of the week. Pain has gone and has not returned.

                    Diagnosis: Over-training/Strain

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have a pain in the joint of my thumb toe.. But that's just because I never got attention from probably some microfractures when a door closed and hit all the front of my toe

                      Comment

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