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  • Easing back into training

    I've been on a two year "break" from Kendo. I was forced to quit after a wrist injury and a crazy schedule that made it impossible for me to make Kendo practice, even after my wrist eventually healed.

    I'm convinced that my wrist injury was because I held the shinai improperly. I've been working on it at home, in private, but was wondering if there are any other exercises people on this forum could suggest. I've been paying attention to the left-hand "three finger rule." It's a change! I feel like my right hand has always controlled the shinai in the past.

    These two years, I've been in other sports that stress the importance of form, which is something I never appreciated during my previous days at the dojo. I've been really humbled and want to start from square one, frankly.

    However, I'm worried about the new dojo I'll be starting in. The sensei is VERY friendly, but unfortunately I think he might have gotten the idea that I'm better than I actually am. I told him I had experience with Kendo and a set of bogu; last time we emailed, he spoke about me perhaps attending the intermediate-advanced levels day, as well as the two beginner days. I'm more than willing to do what he suggests, but don't want to be 'that one girl,' who comes into a dojo, claiming she can do more than she really can. (Because I can't!)

    For the record, I have 2 1/2 years of formal experience. I had some informal experience before that, but it was not at a dojo and it was from a student, like myself. I've never been to a tournament.

    Advice would be welcome. Thank you in advance!

    Kate
    http://katiemcginnis.wordpress.com

  • #2
    I recommend no bogu for the first few classes. This is our SOP for anyone returning after a long break.

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    • #3
      The sensei is VERY friendly, but unfortunately I think he might have gotten the idea that I'm better than I actually am. I told him I had experience with Kendo and a set of bogu; last time we emailed, he spoke about me perhaps attending the intermediate-advanced levels day, as well as the two beginner days. I'm more than willing to do what he suggests, but don't want to be 'that one girl,' who comes into a dojo, claiming she can do more than she really can. (Because I can't!)
      I'd just be upfront and mention you're not sure you're going to be able to keep up with the advanced class and see for yourself. I've not seen it in kendo, but I've seen plenty of dojos that have advanced classes on paper but in reality this is little more than a preference. Perhaps this sensei is suggesting it because their advanced classes aren't all that advanced?

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      • #4
        and just tell the sensei about your concern, he knows better, and have no worry. if he still ask you to wear bogu at the 1st comeback session, perhaps you need to re-expain your concern again.. lol

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        • #5
          I'm not usually a fan of being dishonest, but you might come up with a scheduling conflict that means for the first couple of months you can only attend the non-bogu beginners' class.

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          • #6
            Should be no need for dishonesty. Simly explain that you need to spend some time practising basics to shake the rust off.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by katiemcginnis View Post
              I've been really humbled and want to start from square one, frankly.
              I feel like that all the time.

              Anyway, I had a couple longish breaks due to injury and both times when I came back I skipped the bogu the first class and jumped in with beginners. Particularly since you recognize you didn't put a lot into form and suspect yours might be wrong, I'd tend to think that's a good idea.

              Actually, I'm not sure why you wouldn't just tell your sensei exactly what you just posted here.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jjcruiser View Post
                Actually, I'm not sure why you wouldn't just tell your sensei exactly what you just posted here.
                I think I'm going to do just that. But in person. The first class I can make is a beginner class, so at the end, if I'm not way more advanced than the others (unlikely I would be), then I'll tell him.

                Thanks, everyone!

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                • #9
                  Let us know how it goes! Also, to help with wrist, I myself do the following things (but please get advice from a doctor).

                  -katate suburi (suburi one handed, choke up if you have to)
                  -work with weights, especially wrist curls
                  -push ups

                  FWIW!

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                  • #10
                    Hey Charlie, For lazy folk like me - not wanting to work with weights - do you think using heavier-type nunchaku ("karate sticks")
                    would be useful (am cross-training in karate) would be effective in strengthening and improving wrist flexibility?

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