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Is your sensei kind, compassionate, or a slave driver?

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  • Is your sensei kind, compassionate, or a slave driver?

    Mine is a Slave Driver but I see why though he is heavy on cardio conditioning , it ranks above technique, close but still ranking above it.

  • #2
    Does he need to lose weight?

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    • #3
      Does he need to lose weight?
      haha...anywho, my sensei is kind and at the same time compassionate. most senseis are compossionate in my opinion cause you can't reach that far if you're not compassionate enough. he's also a funny man. i still remember when someone was doing a keiko with him. the student accidentally dropped his shinai while going against him but my sensei didn't stop to let him pick the shinai, instead he kicked the shinai away from him and started whacking a bit. the guy attempted to get his shinai back but my sensei kicked it away again. after that the sensei told him, "are you ok? that was quite an experience, eh?". it was actually funnier if you've seen it, instead of me telling it...lol.

      ~taganahan

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      • #4
        Ahahaha!! Oh, that was funny, taganahan-san!

        That... that is when you must develope the speed of Kenshin and reach the shinai before sensei does! If it had been me, I think I'd nearly be dying of laughter at that point, and then making darned sure I got to it before he did! Evade and duck out of reach until you have the shinai! After all, in a real swordfight, what else are you gonna do?? hehe! You are dead if you just stand there. Your dojomate was smart to keep trying! I can imagine what was going through his mind...hehehe! Poor guy!

        Kaoru

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        • #5
          Hmmmmm....
          If anyone kicks my shinai, even sensei, I will be really pissed off.....
          If I dropped shinai and someone kicks my shinai, I will be tackling him/her.

          Your sensei was trying to teach you how to react when you drop your shinai. if you drop your shinai, you DO NOT try to pick it up! you run to him and grab (wrap your arm) his waist so he wont strike you.

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          • #6
            Hi!

            Though I am not in bogu yet, I think getting mad if someone kicks your shinai away isn't a good way to react. That would make you lose focus and possibly make you careless, and give your opponent the advantage. You want to be calm and collected and use strategy to keep out of the other guy's reach while you go get the shinai. I think it is silly to grab the one who kicked it away. I would not do that. In a real fight, this would get you killed. Ji-geiko, as I understand it, is akin to a real swordfight and should be taken in that manner, IMHO, even though my opinion doesn't mean much just yet. Though, I do have a certain level of TKD sparring experience to know something about sparring. I think I would never back down or resort to grabbing just because it got kicked away. That shows lack of patience and too much a show of emotion if you react in an aggressive manner. I mean for example, showing you are not pleased. Why let them know? Emotions beyond kai and zanshin are useless. They only help your opponent read you. And, they can use it against you.

            Though, I think a non-sensei kicking a shinai away would not be very polite.
            Sensei has a right to do what he wants. Still, a show of calm is always best. It may confuse or bother your opponent that he couldn't rattle you! That is to your advantage.

            Well, please excuse an opinion from a beginnner... *bow* I humbly accept any corrections...

            Kaoru

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            • #7
              uh oh! i just realized my error. i think my sensei didn't kicked the shinai, well he used his own shinai to keep it away from the student.

              you really don't need to grab someone who threw away your shinai. my sensei in this instance was just showing him the consequence and the importance of holding to your shinai, like your life depended on it. every once in a while, you also need to be knocked out to see someone's point.

              ~taganahan

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              • #8
                Originally posted by taganahan
                uh oh! i just realized my error. i think my sensei didn't kicked the shinai, well he used his own shinai to keep it away from the student.

                you really don't need to grab someone who threw away your shinai. my sensei in this instance was just showing him the consequence and the importance of holding to your shinai, like your life depended on it. every once in a while, you also need to be knocked out to see someone's point.

                ~taganahan
                I thought so...
                No sensei would kick shinai..


                Kaoru,
                You should be mad if someone kicking your shinai on purpose, just like some one stepping over your shinai.
                This has nothing to do with your emotion. This is just kendo etiquete.
                And proper way to react when you drop shinai is to close in your oppornent, wraping arm around his waist, so you wont get hit.
                This is how I taught 20yrs ago..... I dont think it has changed.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kirin
                  This is how I taught 20yrs ago..... I dont think it has changed.
                  I was taught this also about 1 and 1/2 year ago. by a reletively young sensei, who is very good at using makiage and makiotoshi to disarm his opponents

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kirin
                    I thought so...
                    No sensei would kick shinai..


                    Kaoru,
                    You should be mad if someone kicking your shinai on purpose, just like some one stepping over your shinai.
                    This has nothing to do with your emotion. This is just kendo etiquete.
                    And proper way to react when you drop shinai is to close in your oppornent, wraping arm around his waist, so you wont get hit.
                    This is how I taught 20yrs ago..... I dont think it has changed.
                    Keiko, yes. Shiai, no. It is supposed to be a hansoku if you do this in shiai although people often do it. You are going to get a hansoku for dropping the shinai anyway, so what the heck I guess.

                    One of my first tournaments as a kyu the guy did this to me and I did a hip roll on him. I was later told by my brother that though it was a nice waza not to do that anymore.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Curtis
                      Keiko, yes. Shiai, no. It is supposed to be a hansoku if you do this in shiai although people often do it. You are going to get a hansoku for dropping the shinai anyway, so what the heck I guess.
                      Curtis Sensei,
                      Dropping shinai during shiai is hansoku, but point can be awarded to a strike immediatly after droping. and many times, shinpan's 'yame' call can be 2-3 seconds after dropping shinai.

                      To avoid this helpless 'ippon', shouldnt we still go for a hip roll ?

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                      • #12
                        I agree the main lesson was to teach you to not drop your shinai, and that kicking the sword is "dishonorable". Even a fellow kendoka should treat the shinai with respect even though it is not theirs.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kirin
                          Curtis Sensei,
                          Dropping shinai during shiai is hansoku, but point can be awarded to a strike immediatly after droping. and many times, shinpan's 'yame' call can be 2-3 seconds after dropping shinai.

                          To avoid this helpless 'ippon', shouldnt we still go for a hip roll ?
                          By hip roll I mean I tossed the guy to the floor. It was the only judo waza I knew.

                          And yes you should do something to avoid the attack by your opponent. Either move in or out. But technically I understand you are not supposed to grab the opponent. I will have to check the rulebook again.

                          You can only get one hansoku, but you can also get tossed out of the match for unsportsmanlike conduct or lose a full point. Again I need to reread the rules.

                          Back to the subject of this thread, I like to be driven hard at times and I will certainly drive my students hard as well. You have to have that reserve when you need it. Driving them hard depends on what we are working on at the time.

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                          • #14
                            Is your sensei kind, compassionate, or a slave driver?
                            It varies

                            Jakob

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                            • #15
                              in my opinion, all senseis should have a combination of them all.

                              ~taganahan

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