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  • Trigger finger...hlep?

    Hi! This has already been discussed briefly before but need bit more help.
    I've got trigger finger problem. It started about month ago and not getting better but worse.
    I've really tried to relax with my grip during the training but didn't seem to work.
    I red a few article in the net and the suggested treatement are steroid injection or operation. I'd like to ask if anyone fixed their trigger finger without having to have an injection or operation. Rather than taking it easy, is there anyother thing I can do? Is it better to keep on using my troublesome fingers or better to leave without moving too much? Any help will be very appreciated. Ta

  • #2
    See your GP.

    Jakob

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    • #3
      You will probably have to amputate it!

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      • #4
        sorry, this doesn't contribute to the topic, but i'm curious: what is a trigger finger? my dicitonary only tells me that's another word for index finger.
        thanks.

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        • #5
          trigger finger = index finger......

          maybe you should try and change how you grip/hold your shinai. that might work but still check it out with a doctor.

          ~taganahan

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          • #6
            Originally posted by moetl
            sorry, this doesn't contribute to the topic, but i'm curious: what is a trigger finger? my dicitonary only tells me that's another word for index finger.
            thanks.
            The tendons that bend your fingers run through a tunnel or sheath. Trigger finger is caused by a thickening on the tendon catching as it runs in and out of the sheath. The most common cause is tenosynovitis. You can often feel this swelling in the palm as you move the finger. The system is very similar to bicycle brake cable. If the wire becomes bent or rusty, the brakes work badly.

            Well, basically my two left fingers usually holding shinai locks into the position how I usually hold shinai and makes difficult to open easily.

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            • #7
              I've had trigger finger caused by improper practice. The pain is annoying, and the inability to use your hands properly is mentally crippling.

              Quick answer: Stop practice immediately, or it will NEVER get better and you'll live in pain all your life.

              Long answer:

              Stop practising swings until it goes away, then wait another few months. If it's a mild case, then it will go away by itself once you stop abusing your hands. You can still practice footwork.

              I can vouch for trigger finger actually just going away with no surgery, no drugs and no injections if you totally cease kendo and drastically reduce other finger activities such as typing. I cannot verify as to whether or not it will recur, since I am on a 2-year-and-counting hiatus from kendo due to said problem. I'd say the probability of recurrence even after a full recovery is very high since I've had it happen to me before. I believe the thickening of the tendon sheath never quite dies down completely and so you're now permanently at a heightened risk compared with the average person. Of course, there are many things you can do to reduce the risk.

              From what I have learnt I believe trigger finger is caused by a sudden onset of intense activity, for example, having never done a lot of manual labour with gripping and striking, suddenly to a full kendo practice twice a week. I am of the opinion that a very gradual program of strengthening the fingers and forearm will eventually condition the tendons to the point where they can accept the stress of kendo practice without triggering a cascading inflammatory response. So, I'm planning to get some of those grip trainer things and slowly train my grip to a good level of strength and flexibility before touching a shinai again in a proper practice. Self-paced, slow practice should also help you learn to use a proper "soft" grip that will not trigger the inflammation even on repeated strikes.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Taek
                Hi! This has already been discussed briefly before but need bit more help.
                I've got trigger finger problem. It started about month ago and not getting better but worse.
                I've really tried to relax with my grip during the training but didn't seem to work.
                I red a few article in the net and the suggested treatement are steroid injection or operation. I'd like to ask if anyone fixed their trigger finger without having to have an injection or operation. Rather than taking it easy, is there anyother thing I can do? Is it better to keep on using my troublesome fingers or better to leave without moving too much? Any help will be very appreciated. Ta
                I had it during my first few months of kendo. Yep, grip was too hard...I adjusted that by holding the shinai lightly and only tightening the grip upon contact. I don't get it anymore so I think its a matter of adjusting your grip on the shinai.

                Best advice is to see a trusted GP.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for your advice. I'm actually thinking about stopping training a couple of weeks and see how my fingers improve. I've got a few sempais at dojo just love doing disarming techinque on me and I gradually ended up holding shinai very tight so I don't loose my shinai during geiko. Well, it is my fault but I'll really try to relax my grip from now on. Hopefully, it gets better without stopping the training too long.
                  Cheers

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Taek
                    Thanks for your advice. I'm actually thinking about stopping training a couple of weeks and see how my fingers improve. I've got a few sempais at dojo just love doing disarming techinque on me and I gradually ended up holding shinai very tight so I don't loose my shinai during geiko. Well, it is my fault but I'll really try to relax my grip from now on. Hopefully, it gets better without stopping the training too long.
                    Cheers
                    Last year at the post World Kendo Championship seminar in Glascow we were shown the proper way to grip the shinai. Hirakawa Sensei demonstrated how if the grip is right, your shinai will naturally move to the center even after your opponent taps it aside...

                    Its a bit hard to explain but your grip should be firm but not tight. If you grip tightly you are overstraining the muscle and tendons...actually, talk to your sensei about it...I'm sure they can help more than we can.

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                    • #11
                      Technique, not strength

                      Originally posted by Taek
                      I've got a few sempais at dojo just love doing disarming techinque on me and I gradually ended up holding shinai very tight so I don't loose my shinai during geiko.
                      Cheers
                      I assume that your problem is with your right finger.
                      When you hold firmly your shinai with your right hand, it give a good rotation point for disarming you. Instead try to hold your shinai more with your left hand (70% / 30%). When people hit your shinai, don't try to resist, let your shinai go out of the center (with your right hand) but come back to the center quickly.
                      Remember, when you open your hand, your fingers should be in an horizontal position, like for a shakehand (and not oriented toward the floor).

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                      • #12
                        I really appreciate for you guys's advice. Yes..I think my grip is wrong. When I first started Kendo ten years ago and until I had to stop due to my neck problem from road accident, I never had the trigger finger problem. It only started as I returned to Kendo a few months ago. Last thing I want is stopping kendo again. I'll try to change my grip and hopefully the problem goes away so I can continue my tranining!!!

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                        • #13
                          GAMBATTE!!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Andoru
                            GAMBATTE!!
                            陳 ?

                            Is that 陳恵祥 or something like that?
                            Sorry for prying.

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                            • #15
                              Life sucks, then you get trigger finger.

                              Originally posted by Haowen
                              From what I have learnt I believe trigger finger is caused by a sudden onset of intense activity...
                              LOL...no wonder.

                              Going to 3 hr kendo practice after moving furnitures around BAD!!!

                              I have trigger finger in the middle finger of my left hand now....

                              Cortisone shot, here I come...

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