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  • home training vrs dojo training

    To all swords art students Which is better?, Home training or Dojo training?

  • #2
    Definitley dojo training. That way you'll be taught the right way and be able to be corrected. Although my senseis tell me to practice at home as well...

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    • #3
      oh... because the only sort of training I do is at home.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tsurugi
        oh... because the only sort of training I do is at home.
        Please describe what training involves for you and where you learned this from?

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        • #5
          I'm curious, how do you train at home? (I happen to be a very curious idiot, I'll apologize for that right now...)

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          • #6
            I... (Blushes ) I'm kind of embarassed to tell but if I did tell please don't say I'm an idiot. I don't use Video tapes nor books but I just make up... Techniques...

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            • #7
              Don't worry, I only call my friends idiots. But I will say , if you're truely interested in learning kendo(I'm assuming this), you should really find a dojo to train in.(Try here: http://www.auskf.info/mainpages/schools.htm ) Its really great and fun, I swear, It'll be one of the best things you'd of ever done. At least, it's definetly that way for me. (You might want to look here too: http://www.auskf.info/mainpages/auskfmain.htm )

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              • #8
                Unless you have the convenience of a Sensei coming over to your house several times a week, you should train at a Dojo. Usually the cheapest ones are at Universities since everyone doesn't have that much money to put down right away. So unless you want to look like a wannabe sword fighter flailing a sword around for no purpose, you must go to a dojo.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tsurugi
                  I... (Blushes ) I'm kind of embarassed to tell but if I did tell please don't say I'm an idiot. I don't use Video tapes nor books but I just make up... Techniques...
                  Nothing really wrong with being original. You could keep going like this however something I've leared is that mixing and matching the two might be hard. For instance while you and some friends might be able to get together and practice for fun you might have trouble going to a dojo and sparring with students. Or if you could spar with them they might feel that your methods were either unrefined or not safe to spar with. However it'd probably be easier to work the other way around, as in going from a dojo to sparring with friends. You should really just stop by a dojo and get a feel for the whole thing personally then see if it's for you. Is there any reason you haven't gone to a dojo yet if I may ask?

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                  • #10
                    Believe it or not, I don't even go to a dojo. I just practice any made-up methods. For the records I don't have any friends that does bother to do swordsmanship.
                    Last edited by Tsurugi; 22nd July 2004, 08:47 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tsurugi
                      Believe it or not, I don't even go to a dojo. I just practice any made-up methods. And for the records, I'm NOT poor.
                      Good, cause keiko gi, hakama, and bogu are expensive...j/k! But they are, really..if thats what you decide to do.

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                      • #12
                        I'm not planning to buy any Iaido, Shinkendo, nor Kendo equipment. That goes for hakamas, Iaito katanas, shinais, sparring equipment, obi and etc. The only sort of equipment I have is a 2 year old bokuto which was broken and then glued back together.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tsurugi
                          Believe it or not, I don't even go to a dojo. I just practice any made-up methods. For the records I don't have any friends that does bother to do swordsmanship.

                          Well that answers some things. To the original question of which is better, well it depends on what you are looking for. If you are happy with your own made up techniques then go with that. People will always critisize you no matter if you made it up or spent years at a dojo. However if you want to be taught swordsmanship by someone who has been practicing thier technique for years then your only choice would seem to be being taught by a sensei. For the record if it was possible I would love to see some of these techniques you are practicing. Also remember that a technique usually isn't something you cand do just a few times and then call a technique. Usually you would practice it many times until you feel it is perfect and then you would begin to make more techniques based off of and adding to the original otherwise you'd just be making random progress (which by the way could still be considered a type of swordsmanship funny enough). In any case, what is better is just a matter of what you think is better

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                          • #14
                            I'm not sure... If I did join a dojo (No matter how fun it did look) I might quit in a few days, weeks or even months later. Because long time ago I thought Tae kwon do would be fun, but all that did was make extreme pain on my back and I got bored of it. (I'm not an old aged person!)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tsurugi
                              I'm not sure... If I did join a dojo (No matter how fun it did look) I might quit in a few days, weeks or even months later. Because long time ago I thought Tae kwon do would be fun, but all that did was make extreme pain on my back and I got bored of it. (I'm not an old aged person!)
                              I feel the same way about the dojo think. To add on some dojo's charge a few months in advance. The luxury of just practicing at home is that you are your own critic and you can do it around your schedule. That's a pretty good combination. The only problem I have with the same setup is that it's hard to find opponents (which is something I care for personaly). I like to train but I also like to measure up against the skill of others. This is something that joining a dojo would partialy allow me to do. I so feel your point on the getting bored though. I don't care about pain or hard work, I can deal with those two no problem but if I get bored then I just flop. Just make sure that if you do visit a dojo that you are clear about exactly what you want out of it and how you want it to happen so that nobody has to waste thier time.

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