Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

videotaping

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • videotaping

    Does anyone have any suggestions on how to incorporate using videotapes in practice? The goal is to help people understand the things they are doing wrong. It is easy not to be aware of problems in your own kendo since you cannot see yourself.

    Here are some specific questions as to the things I am thinking about:

    1) Is it even valuable? Or is it a waste of time? Or worse, a distraction?

    2) Tape "often" or "occasionally"?

    3) Just set the camcorder up in the corner and leave it running through practice, or have people do something like a "mini-test" individually in front of it? The latter is obviously not compatible with taping "often" but it is an option for taping "occasionally."

    4) Review with student or let student review individually and ask questions if they want?

    5) Assuming a monitor is available, review in class or outside of class? (I think in-class seems like too much of a distraction, but maybe someone else has a different opinion.....)

    Those are just the things that leap to mind. I would be interested in any advice anyone has to offer.....

  • #2
    Ocassionally, i hate seeing how much I suck on a regular basis.


    On a serious note, i think it is advantageous. Many dont even realize they are doing something until it is shown to them. I am not sure the best way to go about it though as It i rare someones videotapes us. But when they have, they just stand next to the person that requested it and tape their session.

    Reviewing should be discreet unless the student says otherwise.

    Thats my one cent.

    Comment


    • #3
      I did videotaping for one of our members at his request, using his camera. He wanted me to tape him during jigeiko so he'd have an idea what he was doing wrong.

      I can't speak for anyone else, but if I were to watch a tape of myself, I wouldn't know what I was looking for. I'm not experienced enough yet. The member I taped does know what he's looking for.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hyuna
        Does anyone have any suggestions on how to incorporate using videotapes in practice?
        We use video a fair amount. Every other month or so we record some parts of class and then go up to my house to snack and watch it. "Video parties" as we call them are a nice Kendo related social activity for us.

        Rather than just let the camera run, we typically tape specific parts of class. I may have people line up for suburi while I pan from one student to another. Eight or ten reps apiece is about all that's needed for people to see what's up. Taping the most basic drills is mostly for newbies who can't yet do more advanced stuff, so they still have something to look at during the party.

        We also tape isolated pairs for uchikomi-geiko kirikaeshi, keiko, and kata.

        Though I make copies for anyone who asks, I think reviewing the video all together is useful. We do a lot of slow motion and stop motion analysis. I find that lower ranked people sometimes don't know what to look for, and benefit from having more experienced people to point out important elements of posture, footwork, swing, distance, etc., at crucial moments in time.

        People can be very shy about watching themselves in front of everyone, so we try to be sensitive about it. One rule we have is that nobody gets to make fun of anybody else. We goof on ourselves a lot (there's a lot of humor potential in wisecracks about one's own quirks) and it helps puts shy people more at ease.

        I think video can have a big impact on a student's understanding, and his perception of what is happening in jigeiko especially. It happens so fast that beginners cannot otherwise perceive the difference in the quality of an attack. Scrutinizing every moment of the attack (seme, strike, zanshin) on video, anyone can clearly see the differences between a beginner's strike and an advanced person's strike.

        One interesting phenomenon I've seen is that lower ranked people are often amazed at how much advanced people remember about the matches. Beginners only retain small fragmented memories of their matches because their minds are confused most of the time during a match. I think it is important for them to begin to conceive of a match not as a confusing blur of attacks, but as a connected series of events that has some kind of a logical story behind it. I know video has helped me in that respect.

        Sorry for such a long post.
        Last edited by JByrd; 12th February 2005, 08:24 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Last April I participated in a tournament in our dojo. I took home the 1st place medal and felt really great because I beat a few guys who were quite a bit more experienced than I. The following week someone gave me a video tape of the tournament. I raced home to watch me kick butt. Well, needless to say, I was horrified when I watched the tape. So many things I did just looked bad. I've since improved on a few things that I noticed on the tape. So in my opinion, taping can be extreamly helpful (though really bad for your ego!).


          Joe HIbbs

          Comment


          • #6
            I would be afraid to see a video of myself at kendo. It would be very helpful though, as other people have said.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by John Shin
              So in my opinion, taping can be extreamly helpful (though really bad for your ego!).


              Joe HIbbs
              I had some tape from the Cleveland tournament last year of me. I looked at it and shook my head. God did it look terrible. I hope next time I get some tape time it wont look so bad. The still photographs looked great but tape is another story. For me anyways...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JByrd
                We use video a fair amount. Every other month or so we record some parts of class and then go up to my house to snack and watch it. "Video parties" as we call them are a nice Kendo related social activity for us.
                That is a very clever idea. Unfortunately, I live relatively far away from where we practice, so we cannot go to my place. However, I believe there is a TV there that we can use, so maybe we can occasionally schedule a longer practice time with the people who own the space, and have a little party or something.

                Thanks for all of your input!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I did it by using a cell- phone camera and i was horrible.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X