Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
How to treat Bruised Heel? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to treat Bruised Heel?

    Got a nice bruised heel...was wondering wahts the best way to treat it or fastest way to heal it.

    Thanks

  • #2


    I had a bruised heel last year.. took almost 3 months to finally go away completely... only thing I found was to take it easy on it and let it heal.. no pun

    I used the injury to study other parts of kendo.. example.. Instead of hiki waza when in tsubazerei I would wait or give an opening to my opponent and when they tried hiki I would go in and attack them. Something I hadn't thought on much before I had the bruised heel.

    Comment


    • #3
      Same here....took me a couple of months to heal it as well...mainly because I kept practicing on it. If you can stand being away from Kendo, take a break to let it heal faster....if not...then just suffer while you are having fun.

      Comment


      • #4
        In terms of healing the superficial bruising you might want to try Arnica Ointment or Gel...

        In terms of inner bruising, you might try using a Gel Heel Cup during the day to relieve pressure, then ice up the heel / use an icey gel prior to training and take it easy...

        I would check out back issues of Kendo World to see if there are any tips... they are usually excellent...

        Cheers

        Comment


        • #5
          Be very careful about how you fumikomi, especially with the bruised heel. That means your heel is smashing the ground first and getting the majority of the stress of the impact. Correct fumikomi is landing more on the whole foot, not just on your heel. I am crappy at describing this, but the cure is to not land on your heel. You can still practice with it. As long as you do fumikomi correctly, you won't make it worse. Be mindful of your footwork.

          Comment


          • #6
            Actually, Nodachi-San's post raises a question ... I had assumed (don't know why) that it was your left heel... Is it?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by crabbi
              Actually, Nodachi-San's post raises a question ... I had assumed (don't know why) that it was your left heel... Is it?
              I think Nodachi-San was trying to point out that we should make sure the right toes do not point skyward during the lifting and landing on the right foot. We should maintain our right foot parallel to the floor while it is in the air. That way, the whole foot will land, instead of the heel first as in the case when the toes are pointing skyward.

              In the meantime, try icing your bruised heel.

              Comment


              • #8
                I assume it's his right heel. Stop practising kendo for a month or so - it's the only way. Even if you do correct footwork right now, you'll just reinjure. When you get back, make sure to work with your sensei on proper footwork to prevent recurrance.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by nodachi
                  As long as you do fumikomi correctly, you won't make it worse. Be mindful of your footwork.
                  True. However, try this on a concrete surface.... It hurts either way...

                  I just hurt my foot on a slippery concrete surface. Left foot slid when I pushed off for men, body went forward and consequently my right heel to compensate.. CANK!!!! OUCH!!!!

                  All the surfaces in socal that I have practiced on are hardwood over concrete. No give.. Well I have heard other places that are much softer, but i haven't gone to those places yet....

                  Tim

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nodachi
                    As long as you do fumikomi correctly, you won't make it worse.
                    I disagree. Early on in my career I got a bad bruise and it didn't matter how careful I was, that sucker hurt. But even if you are correct, the odds of him consistently doing exactly correct footwork 100% of the time to avoid injury are pretty slim. Even if he's careful, sooner or later he'll get excited and revert to old habits. So I reiterate, take a break. You're in kendo for the long term (I hope), a month off isn't going to kill you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill
                      a month off isn't going to kill you.
                      I have NCKF champs coming up this weekend... .. Then i'll take a couple of weeks off...

                      Tim

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        See if you can get one of those heel pad things, although I'm leary of my footing in them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Neil Gendzwill
                          See if you can get one of those heel pad things, although I'm leary of my footing in them.
                          They do take a little getting used to and I only wear mine when I need it. The Yamaya model that is made of neoprene, reinforced with leather, and fastened with a velcro strap, is pretty sweet. It gives good arch support as well as padding the heel. It's about $25 USD.

                          What people call a "heel bruise" is sometimes really plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia are strands of connective tissue that connect the heel to the ball of the foot, and help provide the arch on the inside of the foot. When we stamp hard, the arch of the foot flattens, and the plantar fascia are stretched, sometimes to the point of tearing away from the attachment on the heel bone. It can happen even with good footwork, through sheer repetition.

                          One thing that helps me is to wear a shoe all the time. If you normally take your shoes off in the house, get some slippers with substantial rubber soles and wear them in the house.

                          You can also get heel inserts for your regular shoes. I recommend the polyurethane type. They don't wear out because they are noncompressible, and absorb the shock through deformation.

                          If it gets really bad, an orthopedist might give you some relief through hydrocortisone injections. Most people would have to be in a lot of pain before they would consider enduring an injection in the heel.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Its my right foot.
                            I was wearing a heel pad already when I got the bruise.
                            I dont believe its a bad habit that i have adopted ( I made a mistake by leaning back and trying to fumikomi forward causing my right foot toes to look up and making the impact right on my heel).

                            In any case, I'm going to the store today and gonna purchase some bruise ointments.

                            Also , 1 month is way too long to wait for it to heal. Its not my WHOLE heel surface but RIGHT at the edge of it and its literally shaped like JAPAN. I am thinking of taping with a little piece of cushion on the bruise, and then wear my heel pad to practice.


                            I dont have 1 month to spare especially because of upcoming events.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Flylkorean
                              I
                              Also , 1 month is way too long to wait for it to heal. Its not my WHOLE heel surface but RIGHT at the edge of it and its literally shaped like JAPAN. I am thinking of taping with a little piece of cushion on the bruise, and then wear my heel pad to practice.

                              I dont have 1 month to spare especially because of upcoming events.
                              Well, it's unlikely that it's just from one impact that the damage has occured...and if you were already using a heelpad, then it sounds like it has happened before?.
                              The heel is extremly slow healing and you can easily do permanent damage.

                              Jakob

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X