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  • Personal Safety

    Hello Everyone,



    I am a board member of the Israeli Kendo and Budo Federation

    www.kendo.co.il One of the decisions in our last meeting was the increase the trainers personal safety i.e. prevention of training accidents. Does any one have anything to contribute? For example do you have regular equipment inspection any guide lines to follow? Do any of the official bodies have regulation on that?

    (We are talking about Iaido, Kendo and Jo)



    Please e-mail me at mosheshanon@gmail.com



    Best Regards,

    Moshe Shanon

    Equipment Officer.

  • #2
    My senseis always remind the beginners that aren't in keikogi and hakama to roll up their trousers if they could be too long and during taiso while we have to run we are warned about the possible too long hakama.

    Ofcourse we are reminded to check our shinai before ji-geiko.

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    • #3
      I have several things in mind.

      1. Eat a good meal, preferrably something with carbs and protein, before going to practice, yet do not eat them too close to the time of practice or some of that meal might end up on the floor.

      2. Drink lots of water before practice. This is especially important for those that wear armor since most people do sweat a lot.

      3. Before ANYTHING is done in Kendo, make sure that you stretch first. It will reduce injury due to non-flexible muscles and it helps reduce the lactic acid buildup from straining your muscles.

      4. If you notice any sort of pain beyond blisters during Kendo, tell the sensei/sempai immediately! It's foolhardy to think that you can go on with an injury untreated. We need to gain more kendokas, not lose them to injury due to wanting to be "samurai-like" or tough.

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      • #4
        Shinai maintenance.

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        • #5
          Shinai maintenance.
          yes i think that would be the most important, one of the scariest things in kendo, is learning that one of your friends have never oiled/sanded their shinais...

          some dojos dont even tell their students (how) to do so..

          Comment


          • #6
            First Aid

            I agree with all the points that were mentioned in the previous posts.

            Keeping a first aid kit in the dojo and having at least one person who knows how to apply first aid might also be ideal.
            Last edited by vyung; 2nd October 2005, 07:33 AM.

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            • #7
              The shinai maintenance as others have said is most important. All dojo either need to have alert sempai who will inform newbies at some point about how to do it, or having an unofficial mini meeting after practice with newbies after they practice for a few weeks to teach them the importance of it and how to do it.

              Other things are obvious, like blisters, bruises, etc. You see it, say ouch, and get it fixed. But new people just don't think about their shinai.

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              • #8
                Blood on the dojo floor from mishaps. Ensure that it is cleaned up with dissinffectent immediately, to minimise the chance of spreading any blood born virus`. The bleeder should then be asked to commit seppuku.

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                • #9
                  Seiza seizure.... fix your order there... if you clean up the blood and THEN order sepuku, you have to do twice the cleaning. The sepuku should be immediate so you only have to clean once!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nodachi
                    Seiza seizure.... fix your order there... if you clean up the blood and THEN order sepuku, you have to do twice the cleaning. The sepuku should be immediate so you only have to clean once!

                    How silly of me. Good thinking there nodachi. No double handling!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Moshe Shanon
                      Do any of the official bodies have regulation on that?
                      DKenB (the german kendo association) requires taking apart and reassembling your shinai for 5th kyu - under the watchfull eyes of the grading committee.
                      Most people hate that part of the grading, some don't perform very well, but I think at that stage you should be able to perform such a mandatory task of shinai maintenance, so it's not that out of place.
                      Would frighten me of someone with 6-12 month kendo experience doesn't know how to disassemble his shinai for maintenance (sanding & oiling).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ReKru
                        DKenB (the german kendo association) requires taking apart and reassembling your shinai for 5th kyu - under the watchfull eyes of the grading committee.
                        Most people hate that part of the grading, some don't perform very well, but I think at that stage you should be able to perform such a mandatory task of shinai maintenance, so it's not that out of place.
                        Would frighten me of someone with 6-12 month kendo experience doesn't know how to disassemble his shinai for maintenance (sanding & oiling).
                        There's a good idea...probably adds a lot of time to the shinsa though.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paikea
                          There's a good idea...probably adds a lot of time to the shinsa though.
                          Not that much. Maybe an additional 5-10 minutes while the judges fill in the extensive paperwork german gradings require.

                          Don't know if that's a DKenB rule, but every tournament I've attended until now had mandatory shinai checks before the action started.
                          Not measuring the shinai, but some experienced people looking at the condition of the shinais that are going to be used in the tournament - checking for splinters, if all the cords are tightly tied etc.
                          Those that pass get marked (usually some fancy colored tape around the handle) and only the ones that passed are allowed to be used.

                          Adds at least some minimal security that you don't get clubbed to death with the least splintering club someone found at the bottom of his drawer.

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                          • #14
                            That happens at lots of tournaments, but the ones I have been to use a stamp that gets stamped on the shinai by the tsuba.

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                            • #15
                              You said it!

                              Originally posted by Anime12478
                              4. If you notice any sort of pain beyond blisters during Kendo, tell the sensei/sempai immediately! It's foolhardy to think that you can go on with an injury untreated. We need to gain more kendokas, not lose them to injury due to wanting to be "samurai-like" or tough.
                              So true! The most important point IMHO.

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