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  • Exhausted momentum..

    Scene : I tari-tari strongly (apologies for terminology) my opponent moves backward, but not to full distance. I seem to be stood there like a Lemon.

    Should I push harder??
    Should I move back??

    I think my problem is due to lack of fitness and the ability to maneuver correctly. (I charge in clumsily)... but I would love to hear your advice.

    Thanks in advance,
    Paulo

  • #2
    Hiki-men! That'll teach him

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by emitbrownne
      Scene : I tari-tari strongly (apologies for terminology) my opponent moves backward, but not to full distance. I seem to be stood there like a Lemon.

      Should I push harder??
      Should I move back??

      I think my problem is due to lack of fitness and the ability to maneuver correctly. (I charge in clumsily)... but I would love to hear your advice.

      Thanks in advance,
      Paulo
      Tai-atari?

      After the push from tai-atari, bring your shinai down to chudan and press the tip of your shinai against his mune or ago. Step back a bit if he doesn't go back far enough. Maintain center. From here, you can either back up slowly into maai or hiki-men.

      Comment


      • #4
        Tired during bout? Tai-atari... rest... kiai... push... tai-atari... rest... kiai... repeat until shinpan flag you down.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Hai_hai
          Tired during bout? Tai-atari... rest... kiai... push... tai-atari... rest... kiai... repeat until shinpan flag you down.
          woah! hang on. taiatari, and any subsequent tsuba-zeriai, is definitely NOT a time to be "resting." if you're up against anyone who knows what they're doing, tsuba-zeriai can be a very risky situation that requires your FULL attention.

          if you are tired during a bout, it just means you need to train harder during normal practice.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Halcyon
            woah! hang on. taiatari, and any subsequent tsuba-zeriai, is definitely NOT a time to be "resting." if you're up against anyone who knows what they're doing, tsuba-zeriai can be a very risky situation that requires your FULL attention.

            if you are tired during a bout, it just means you need to train harder during normal practice.
            Well, no, you shouldn't be resting at tsuba-zeriai but that doesn't mean I haven't seen it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by emitbrownne
              Scene : I tari-tari strongly (apologies for terminology) my opponent moves backward, but not to full distance. I seem to be stood there like a Lemon.

              Should I push harder??
              Should I move back??

              I think my problem is due to lack of fitness and the ability to maneuver correctly. (I charge in clumsily)... but I would love to hear your advice.

              Thanks in advance,
              Paulo
              If you tai-atari into your opponent and s/he moves back as a result, you have actually created an OPENING, so you must use oikomi men, i.e. a follow-up men moving FORWARD. Never move back. This takes training and some fitness but the effect is devastating on your opponent when they realise that you will come at them no matter what.

              b

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              • #8
                hiki kote or hiki do seem to work for me in this situation

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi paul,

                  as i train with you often, i think i know what you are reffering to,

                  my humble advice on this situation would be to use hiki-waza, however you must not let the situation go on too long before you attack. you should tai-atari then instantly hiki-waza, with no intent of tsuba-zeriai, if you understand what i mean, if not i will try and articulate in person...

                  Andy

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Arrrgghh!!!!!


                    sorry, didn't realise i was logged in as Kim!

                    doh! above post was by me...

                    Andy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ben
                      If you tai-atari into your opponent and s/he moves back as a result, you have actually created an OPENING, so you must use oikomi men, i.e. a follow-up men moving FORWARD. Never move back. This takes training and some fitness but the effect is devastating on your opponent when they realise that you will come at them no matter what.b
                      Thats fine and when I can .. thats what I do, but what I'm referring to is when your opponent recieves quite strong... moves back but not into a good distance for a cut.... there is often only a gap of a foot or a foot and a half... and I end up stood there gaping like a fish on land....

                      Thanks for the reply
                      Paulo

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by D'Artagnan
                        Arrrgghh!!!!!


                        sorry, didn't realise i was logged in as Kim!

                        doh! above post was by me...

                        Andy
                        what are you doing stalking the forum pretending to be a lady???
                        Is there something you are not telling us ?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by D'Artagnan
                          Arrrgghh!!!!!


                          sorry, didn't realise i was logged in as Kim!

                          doh! above post was by me...

                          Andy
                          It takes a lot of balls to admit you have a dual identity as your own girlfriend.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by emitbrownne
                            Thats fine and when I can .. thats what I do, but what I'm referring to is when your opponent recieves quite strong... moves back but not into a good distance for a cut.... there is often only a gap of a foot or a foot and a half... and I end up stood there gaping like a fish on land....
                            Try a hiki sayumen. Strike both sides while going backwards. Step back for the first strike, take a short step back back for the second strike. Then back up. It should be performed quickly like "mega-speed kirikaeshi".

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Hai_hai
                              It takes a lot of balls to admit you have a dual identity as your own girlfriend.
                              Maybe both he and his girlfriend do kendo and log-on to this forum with the same computer?

                              My wife and I use the same computer to log on to another forum...she posted as me a few times by mistake....

                              Comment

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