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Ai-jodan: what are the target areas?

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  • Ai-jodan: what are the target areas?

    A question for the jodan specialists on the forum. In ai-jodan, what are the target areas? What are the best waza?

    b

  • #2
    Hidari kote (the forward kote) is a good target, but like everything, it will take some practice because if you're playing hidari jodan, the angle of attack is opposite of what you would normally be used to. (Because in hidari jodan, the tip of the shinai is angled slightly toward your right). But be careful not to seme with the tip of the shinai angled to your left. It can be a dead giveaway that you're aiming for your opponent's kote.

    And, of course, men and doh. As from chudan, if both players go for men, the one with the better seme and domination of the center will strike men. It can be a beautiful sight to behold!

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    • #3
      Thanks Halcyon.

      b

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      • #4
        In my experience, most cuts in ai-jodan tend to be ai-uchi , so I tend to go for the men, usually by trying to pressure the opponent into an attack on my kote. The moment you attack (especially if you attack the kote), your men will be wide open. If you cut men, you can at least protect the center of your men, as long as your cut is straight.

        Jakob

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        • #5
          I remember when the new students joined in april, our coach gave them each a nice 'welcome' practice. One of the guys, fairly tall, was a reasonably accomplished player, but needless to say, he didn't manage to make much of a dent on our coach (who has the most enviable suriage-men against jodan techniques in that as he does it he somehow manages to go forward with full power, without getting hit and somehow managing to have enough distance to strike a clean men even against speedy students, something I've never seen before or since). Anyway, the coach got bored so he went into jodan as well, and although he was mainly just picking off the guy's kote at will, he also showed some nice kote-nuki-men. Basically, by setting his hands a touch lower and more forward than his normal jodan, he a) tempts the other person with an oh-so-hittable kote, and b) gives himself plenty of 'slack' to draw his hands upwards. It's a bit like kata no.1, except by dropping and puuting the hands even further forward than shidachi would in no.1 (although still a subtle change from normal jodan) you have enough slack in the arms to be able to dodge without having to move your body back, which is a bit too slow for shinai kendo. Well, after you've dodged their katate kote strike and they're left helpless with shinai almost at waist level... well, I'm sure you know what to do!
          I should add that being tall is particularly useful for this (the coach is even taller than the student). If you imagine the opponent's shinai path coming towards a tall person's kote and a short person's kote, you'll probably be able to understand that it's a lot easier for a taller guy to get his hands completely out of the way/not get hit men by the dodged shinai.

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          • #6
            I should qualify that post by saying that I've never even tried jodan myself, this is just what I thought I saw. Then again, having Toda sensei as director of kendo makes you take a bit of interest in jodan...

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            • #7
              vote for kerry or nader!!!!

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              • #8
                sorry for the dumb post, i dont know what got over me

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                • #9
                  Traditionally in Ai-Jodan, the side who hits first loses (like Ai-Chudan in Chikama (close distance)). Please think about it: if you go for Hidari-Kote and miss it, your Men is wide open.

                  BUT I am not trying to say that you should wait for the opponent. Rather, you need to do seme and Hikidasu (draw the opponent), or more philosophical term Ken-Tai-Icchi (Offense and Defense in One). And if the opponent is Itsuku (frozen), you go ahead to hit either Kote.
                  Please practice basics (Katate Men and Kote).

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                  • #10
                    Just found some interesting reading on jodan:
                    http://www.halifaxkendo.org/jodanwaza.html

                    Hope it helps.

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                    • #11
                      very nice!

                      Thanks Wally, excellent link!

                      b

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