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beginner technical problem

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  • beginner technical problem

    please explain how to do taiatari in detail,my sensei didn't explain about it much and i want to do it right.

    and when practice men uchi(tobikomi men) when the men was hit and I have to passing through my partner,what is a correct position of my hand and arm? should it stay the sam as when men was hit

  • #2
    Kendo is impossible to explain on the internet, but...

    Taiatari requires you to keep your hands down in front of your hara (belly), with your shinai vertical. Your kote and yuor opponent's kote connect with each other, both tsubas at the same height. This position is therefore called "tsubazeriai" (tsuba coming together - ?). You should not do taiatari with hands at chest height or higher, this can cause unnecessary injuries to your opponent, especially their neck. Arms are used like springs to absorb the shock. Remain light and ready to move if receiving, especially against heavier opponent. It is like one snooker ball hitting another. If it is necessary to receive taiatari and NOT move back after receiving, lean forward slightly with your upper body as you receive your opponent. This will enable you to hold you ground against a strong attack.

    Hand position after cut: basically right arm should be horizontal (or parallel with the ground). Do not get in the habit of lifting your arms back above your head after the cut. When you follow through just drive straight ahead. Do not go around your opponent. Go straight. If you are practicing basics they must move out of the way. If you are doing jigeiko it's a little different. But straight through the centre is always the ideal in kendo. Gnabatte kudasai!

    b

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    • #3
      should we use arm or do to push the other away?

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      • #4
        You use your WHOLE BODY, the momentum of your whole body, to move them. This force is concentrated in your hara, which is your belly, or your centre-of-gravity.

        Beyond this you must ask your sensei.

        b

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