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  • Strikes: hand/foot timing

    Help!

    A little over a week ago the main sempai in my dojo said that I was striking on my back foot, instead of simultaneously when my right foot would come to a stop as it moves forward.

    After much practice and work, I change this deeply entrenched bad habit, and am complemented by the same sempai that my timing is much better, just start speeding things up a bit. Sounds good to me, I'm proud of my acomplishment.

    Later that same practice sensei tells me that I need to lead with my right foot, then start moving the hands (opposite of what sempai said). In this way my handswill catch up with my feet, and my speed will increase.

    Argh. Are these two instructions in conflict, or is it just the next step in training? Any other insight from people on how to spped things up, as well as keeping good timing?

    Thanks in advance

  • #2
    I dont think there is a conflict here, perhaps youve misunderstood. The sempai is correct, you should land your right foot at about the same time as the strike is hitting. Your sensei probably noticed something in your form, start the whole movement with your right foot before you bring your hands up, but same thing applies for the end, both should be timed about the same time.

    Comment


    • #3
      If I understand your post correctly, it seems your sensei is just taking your sempai's advice to the next level instead of contradicting it. Your back foot (left foot) should not be the focus of weight when you strike. I think this is what your sempai means. Then anticipate your full weight (and power of the cut) landing on your right foot by 'leading' with it.

      I might be totally off to your specific situation but the general advice I would give is this: Even though you might get several seemingly disagreeing instructions, try them all. Then you will come to understand with time in your own way why the technique exists and its importance.

      Comment


      • #4
        http://www.kendo-world.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5206

        http://www5a.biglobe.ne.jp/~ichini/b...233449162.html
        More than half way down.

        Comment


        • #5
          The foot and strike is very difficult to correct. I finally corrected this by a few sempai suggestions. You should think of using your knee to push you forward instead of your heel. Also, is your right foot going up before it lands? If so, that will kill the distance you can go and you will also become unbalanced. You basically go up and straight back down instead of out and forward. This might cause your left knee to bend giving you a very bad form. Also, you need to use your waist and not your arms to project yourself forward, otherwise you'll end up doubling over and losing your balance.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by twotoedgiraffe
            You should think of using your knee to push you forward instead of your heel. Also, is your right foot going up before it lands? If so, that will kill the distance you can go and you will also become unbalanced. You basically go up and straight back down instead of out and forward.
            Wowzers. Can you explain the mechanics of the above said sentence? This is a new and rather unorthodox sounding technique. My understanding is you used to project yourself forward by using your heel. Heel on which foot? Now you are saying that you use your knee. Which knee and how does that propel you forward? I am having a very diffcult time visualing this and your assitance would be appreciated.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Mikeyprime
              My understanding is you used to project yourself forward by using your heel.
              Hmm...I'm not understanding how that would work, since you are not suppose to place weight on your heels.

              In "Itto-Ryu Gokui", Sasamori sensei writes about focusing on a pressure point called Yongchuan, which is roughly on the inner back edge of the balls of your feet.

              http://www.tcmadvisory.com/reflex/treat6.htm

              FWIW.

              Comment


              • #8
                Very confusing indeed. Just started to get a headache trying to figure out how to coordinate your hands with your feet. I guess it is easier said than done.

                Good luck Theta! Why don't you ask your sempais about the questions you have. If you feel the advice you are getting is contradicting, ask you sensei. That is what I would do.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I suppose it was confusing totell you to use your heel to move. Basically, you should consider watching to make sure your right foot isn't going up in the motion similar to kicking a ball. It should be parelleled to the floor and move forward that way. If that foot is landing on the heel, then that means you're not actually moving as much forward as you should be. That means that you'll be out of synch with your strike. That was one thing that I had to correct. Hope that clears it up.....although Kuzu70 is correct. These things are probably better left to actually showing you instead of expressing through words...just gets too confusing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mikeyprime
                    My understanding is you used to project yourself forward by using your heel.
                    You aren't suppose to bend your back knee as you move forward. All of the power comes from the left ankle/calf. Your left leg should remain pretty straight as you attack and move. Flexing the left ankle while keeping your left knee straight should move your entire body forward with the hara (gut) as the lead. That is why you see alot of kendoka stretch their calf/ankles specifically, so they can jump quicker and further without possible injury.

                    Bending your left knee tends to make you lean back unneccessarily. Keep your leg straight and your body forward when you flex that left ankle.

                    As for the foot/hand timing, you want to end your strike with your right foor regardless on if you are moving backwards or forwards. It's called ki-ken-tai-ichi. Some people swing slower than they can jump so people tend to tell them to move on their downswing. Others swing faster so they are told to move as they swing up.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Rularn
                      You aren't suppose to bend your back knee as you move forward. All of the power comes from the left ankle/calf.
                      ... and the left buttock.

                      I agree with most of what Rularn said, I'd like to add that when attacking going forward, the left foot should already be on it's way forward when the right foot hits the floor. A lot of people (including me, sometimes) will only start to drag in the left foot after the right foot has hit the floor, which decreases the sharpness of the strike, and delays the follow through.

                      To remedy that problem I have been working on scooting my left foot under me at the same instant my right foot hits the floor, trying to connect the energy of the stamping to the energy of drawing my feet back together. It feels kind of like a scissors action with the legs.

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