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  • Kensen at my tsuki when I do men cut

    Hi guys, can anyone out there help me with this one ? It keeps happening to me, and sometimes the kensen miss the tsuki and jabs my neck damn. Sometimes when I do a men cut, some people leave their kensen right at my tsuki so when I get close enough and half way through my men cut I run right into it. It really sux, and kinda happens a lot, how do I go around this one ?

  • #2
    when they go for ur tsuki (during a spar) just push ther shinai or step bak. and when u do a men cut and ther shinai gets u in the tsuki means that they got the center controlled. u hav to do somthin that will make them lose the center line.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pokie
      Hi guys, can anyone out there help me with this one ? It keeps happening to me, and sometimes the kensen miss the tsuki and jabs my neck damn. Sometimes when I do a men cut, some people leave their kensen right at my tsuki so when I get close enough and half way through my men cut I run right into it. It really sux, and kinda happens a lot, how do I go around this one ?
      normaly like JoonShik it's because they control center well and there was not really any opportunity.....

      hey but pokie! sometimes there is some people that keep on doing that just because they are soooo lazy ! I hate it too! I guess the best thing to do is not being scared of the kensen and go for it anyway!

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      • #4
        Pokie: been doing jigeiko with Fukuda sensei lately hmm?

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        • #5
          I get impaled against high grade sensei a lot too because of their strong kamae. Sometimes I try harai waza or nidan waza....

          As for Fukuda sensei, he attempted 6 tsuki in a row on me! Then he went into Jo-dan.

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          • #6
            A question...

            While doing Ji-Geiko, one try men but there isnt suki (chance of strinking). Should the motodachi open his kamae and let enter the men or should keep the center although "impaling" the uchidachi?

            Thanks

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Itto_Okami
              A question...

              While doing Ji-Geiko, one try men but there isnt suki (chance of strinking). Should the motodachi open his kamae and let enter the men or should keep the center although "impaling" the uchidachi?

              Thanks
              I would be interested to hear people's opinion on this topic as well.

              IMHO, the issue of whether to impale or not depends on the level of your aite.

              I always open up when fencing kohais, because they are far too early in their kendo training, and a mukae tsuki may easily cause them to worry to much about your kensen and not pay enough attention to developing their own skills and form. It took me almost 6 months of deliberately jumping into tsukis to somewhat overcome my fear of the kensen, ingrained into me during my kyu days when the sensei impaled me with a mukae tsuki, and put me out of action for an entire month (fractured ribcage? not sure).

              It's okay to impale when fencing peers and younger sempais. Older sempais I try not to tsuki. It's a non-issue when fencing sensei, because they usually wipe the floor with me anyways.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pokie
                It really sux, and kinda happens a lot, how do I go around this one ?
                It's because you are not controlling the center when you attack. If it against a senior, he either wants you to wait for better opportunity or make a bigger effort to control the center, both prior and during the attack.
                If the shinai is going underneath the tsuki-dare, then you are probably lifting your head as you are cutting. Keep your head straight.

                Jakob

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                • #9
                  I think you need to have some understanding of kamae if you are going to do jigeiko. Otherwise it is just wacking people in the head, hoping for a lucky shot. So I think impaling is good, but also deliberate openings, so that the difference becomes clear.

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                  • #10
                    I second what Kanyi said. Doing mugae-zuki against beginners is a big no-no in my books. I only do it against my peers or seniors if there is no attempt to control center either physically or psychologically.

                    I just want to add what my sensei said to us many times: if one has enough time to do mugae-zuki, one has enough time to counter.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Andoru
                      I second what Kanyi said. Doing mugae-zuki against beginners is a big no-no in my books.
                      Define "beginner". I was just using it against one of our new shodans (yes, still "beginner" the way I define things) to make a point about her charging in heedlessly. It's just another teaching tool: for yourself, too - it's a great drill for learning to keep centre.

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                      • #12
                        I understand what you mean. For me, beginner in this context is taken to mean people relatively fresh in bogu. If the seniors and sensei want to do mugae-zuki against them to teach them about center, then by all means. As for me, I don't think I'm qualified to do that.

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                        • #13
                          I also get mukae-tsukied a lot. When that happens I usually keep my head down and go at it more. Even with the opponent's kensen at my tsuki, I would go for a second and third men, until I break the opponent's kensen. Of course this is during keiko. Shiai is a different story.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Andoru
                            I just want to add what my sensei said to us many times: if one has enough time to do mugae-zuki, one has enough time to counter.
                            I disagree somewhat with that. At your most basic, you have your kamae. It's when you break that, that you get hit...and that's where I always start when I do ji-geiko: First make sure I got as good a kamae as possible. After that, you can start worrying about the rest.

                            Jakob

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                            • #15
                              Think about it, if you recklessly charge into someone's sword in a real fight, what would happen? Now apply this to Kendo, why should they move their shiani out of their way to let you attact them? There are various ways to position yourself or knock their shinai so that you wouldn't run into their sword when attempting men cut.

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