Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

tai-a-tari?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • tai-a-tari?

    Am I the only girl with this problem? When doing tai-a-tari with a male, I find it really hard. Im glad the males aren't going easy on me but I end up being pushed all the way across the floor and I can't even push back due to strength differences. And I find if I do they can practically knock me on my back because of there force. And If I try to push away from them fast and hit a men they still run me over im not strong enough to push them or nudge them because their still charging and holding their weight against me.

    So I have a question,
    Open to male or female advice, when doing tai-a-tari with a man what ways are there, that can get me out of that position? Is there anything I can do with my shinai or something?

  • #2
    Originally posted by kendogrl View Post
    Am I the only girl with this problem? When doing tai-a-tari with a male, I find it really hard. Im glad the males aren't going easy on me but I end up being pushed all the way across the floor and I can't even push back due to strength differences. And I find if I do they can practically knock me on my back because of there force. And If I try to push away from them fast and hit a men they still run me over im not strong enough to push them or nudge them because their still charging and holding their weight against me.

    So I have a question,
    Open to male or female advice, when doing tai-a-tari with a man what ways are there, that can get me out of that position? Is there anything I can do with my shinai or something?
    Well not tai-a-tari but tsubazeriai when we lock the tsuba's. My mistake.

    Comment


    • #3
      One of my friends had the same problem, basically I told her that if I start to push her around all she really has to do is move to the side a little so I can't just plow straight into her.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Anonymous View Post
        One of my friends had the same problem, basically I told her that if I start to push her around all she really has to do is move to the side a little so I can't just plow straight into her.
        Sometimes that becomes really hard if your shinais are hooked, or putting pressure against eachother. It makes it harder to slide off to the side.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hard as it may be to believe, you have the advantage. Your center of gravity is lower, and you have the better angle. Hold your ground by putting strength into your abs and lower back muscles. Maintain strength in your neck so you don't get bent back. Keep your shoulders and arms relaxed; don't try to match him strength for strength. Rather, just maintain enough strength so that you don't collapse your structure. When pushing back. push up; you'll have your whole body supporting your push up, and he'll only have his shoulder and upper body strength for pushing down. Raise his center of gravity and have your way with him.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by kendogrl View Post
            Im glad the males aren't going easy on me but I end up being pushed all the way across the floor and I can't even push back due to strength differences. And I find if I do they can practically knock me on my back because of there force.
            While people do push around in shiai, I've always been told that it's bad Kendo to push around too much. Some pressure is necessary, but when you receive enough to get pushed back and even knocked down, I think that's just excessive force.

            You should probably ask them to calm down a bit, or maybe ask your teacher for advice on how to deal with this. One of my teachers/instructors/senpai is a big bulky guy, and if he wants to he can knock everyone to their ass any day, but no one's going to learn anything that way. We have 8-12 year old girls in our dojo, and it's only common sense to hold back so they don't get hurt.

            Comment


            • #7
              2 years ago while helping out the dojo with the Fu Metsu cup there was someone pushing everybody around with tai-a-tari.

              There was one of the ladies who used this to her advantage being lighter and faster on her feet.

              She joined in the pushing, stepping out as he did some sort of charge taking him of balance making him step out.

              Basicly his aim was pushing people out, very bad kendo.

              You should have heard my sensei afterwards when everybody was gone and we had everything cleaned up.

              He always teaches us it's better to lose doing good kendo then win doing bad kendo.

              BTW, she won, in such kicking him out of the cup

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Josh Reyer View Post
                Hard as it may be to believe, you have the advantage. Your center of gravity is lower, and you have the better angle. Hold your ground by putting strength into your abs and lower back muscles. Maintain strength in your neck so you don't get bent back. Keep your shoulders and arms relaxed; don't try to match him strength for strength. Rather, just maintain enough strength so that you don't collapse your structure. When pushing back. push up; you'll have your whole body supporting your push up, and he'll only have his shoulder and upper body strength for pushing down. Raise his center of gravity and have your way with him.
                Sorry, that simply doesn't work. Big guy vs small girl (who tries to stand her ground as you describe) = Small girl gets hurt.

                You have to learn to absorb part of it and use the rest to 'bounce' back.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JSchmidt View Post
                  Sorry, that simply doesn't work. Big guy vs small girl (who tries to stand her ground as you describe) = Small girl gets hurt.

                  You have to learn to absorb part of it and use the rest to 'bounce' back.
                  All other things being equal a lower center of gravity prevails. However, all other things never are equal so in most cases this is true.

                  Just to continue, after you bounce hiki-men/do/kote the guy. Or avoid tsubzeriai by doing mawari techniques (very common to see in my neck of the woods)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JSchmidt View Post
                    Sorry, that simply doesn't work.
                    No need to apologize, I'm the one getting shoved around by little old men 5 inches shorter and 20 pounds lighter than me.

                    In the interest of clarity, though, I wasn't recommending she get into a shoving match (specifically why I said "don't match strength for strength"), but rather suggesting a way to maintain structure so she isn't physically dominated. (Also, note that despite the thread subject, the problem in question really concerns tsuba-zeriai, not tai-atari. What I wrote was not meant to be a method of dealing with tai-atari.)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If someone quite tall is really getting physical, all I have to do is have my hands right down near my hara, and the next taiatari they find my tsuba pushing them back in a rather uncomfortable place - one of the advantages of being short. That distracts them enough for me to get out of tsubazeriai, hopefully scoring a hiki-cut along the way.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        What is mawari techniques?

                        Regardless what you do, you should keep the left foot well behind you with the knee fairly straight, so that you can not be pushed onto your heels (and put on you ass). Keep the hands at the natural position for you, so if they do tsuba zerai correctly, they will push in front of your hara and not in chest height because you have raised your hands. If your hands are at the right place, and they choose to push higher up, they will then push the shinai, chest or even head if they are silly enough. Personally though, I try not to engage in pushing matches. People who try to push you around, do that because they have no better options, so if you try not to go into a pushing match and attempt hiki instead, you should be able to get out of there fairly easy.
                        Last edited by H.Sandsleth; 10th October 2008, 05:23 PM. Reason: edit

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here's a couple other ideas:
                          allow him to push forward and as your opponent's weight starts to come forward, you step back at 30-45 degrees and giving way slightly and then push and hiki waza.

                          notice when he's preparing to push and before his attack comes, you push back, like debana waza.

                          tsubazerai like any other waza requires timing and control of distance. As a smaller, lighter opponent, you do have advantages if you can figure out how to use them.

                          We can usually change directions and angles of attacks more quickly but to use that to advantage, we have to develop a better sense of timing and awareness of the opponent's intent.

                          sean

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by turboyoshi View Post
                            allow him to push forward and as your opponent's weight starts to come forward, you step back at 30-45 degrees and giving way slightly and then push and hiki waza.
                            I have seen many people use this technique to a great success. I often play a woman who is under 5'-6" and I'm 6'-5" and she just crushes me with this technique. If I allow her half an arms distance in tai-a-tari she just hits any hiki waza and its over. It's hard to master but once you have it any time someone gets into tai-a-tari with you you'll be a force to be reckoned with.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Dont try to push at your opponents height, push at your level. You will probably have more success. As a taller player, I find it really easy to push players around if they push up against me instead of at their own level. Keep your back straight, and your hands around your belly. But dont let your hands get crushed between your and your opponents do....ouch.
                              Practice during kirikaeshi!

                              but Kendo it's not sumo either, so dont worry about pushing. If your opponent wants to push, try the angle trick

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X