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Bruises again/ kote strikes

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  • Bruises again/ kote strikes

    Hy,

    Been a bit busy till now, I hate my job GRRRRRR .
    Anyways, I know you talked before about this but please bear with another stupid question about bruises, especially bruises on the arms that appear after missed kote strikes or just really, really hard hits.
    The problem is that I have a really white skin and these marks always draw attention (my boss keeps on laughing of me each and every time he sees me after a kendo practice , not to mention the look I get from other people that dont have the courage to ask about all the black, blue and red spots on my arm ) and is really frustrating.
    Untill now it was ok because is winter and I can go to work with long sleeves, but in the summer, I hate to think about it
    How do you do it what should I get in order to heal faster or to hide those marks? It is really frustrating because Im used to wearing T-shirts and stuff.
    Ok I can bear not wearing a skirt but I cannot wear long sleeve in the summer.
    And dont tell me just dont get hit, is not working, im a beginner I get beat up each and every practice.

    Are there tips & tricks you could tell me, any advice will be most appreciated
    Thanks

    Just remembered, is it ok to get bruises every time you receive a kote hit? I mean my hand looks like a Dalmatian skin and its really swollen after practice.
    Is it supposed to be like this?
    I should probably make a T-shirt with this written:
    Nomy husband/boyfriend didnt beat me up, I just practice Japanese fencing

  • #2
    I can't talk from experience, having just got bogu myself - but you could perhaps invest in a kote-protector? (such as this) Also, if your kote is old, I hear the padding can get run down and hurt more than it would with a new kote.

    Comment


    • #3
      When I start getting bashed on my kote during uchikomigeiko, I adjust the target. People who swing for the floor don't get to hit my kote, I let them hit my tsuba/shinai. They usually can't tell the difference anyway.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JByrd View Post
        When I start getting bashed on my kote during uchikomigeiko, I adjust the target. People who swing for the floor don't get to hit my kote, I let them hit my tsuba/shinai. They usually can't tell the difference anyway.
        So how can they learn?. In those cases, I move my kote out of the way and let them hit the floor. Usually they lose balance as well and it's a much easier way of getting the point across.

        Comment


        • #5
          A kote protector is nice but it is not ok to get bruises all the time. You don't need alot of force to strike kote. When you are receiving make sure you recieve properly so not to encourage people to hit kote from the side. Make sure their is space in between the kotetsu (area the strike on the kote) and your wrist. If you don't want to get a kote protector or have to wait for it to be shipped try wearing a wrist band and move it up a little. But alot of time people do hit kote really hard, have little control when striking or don't adjust despite striking women and children. Kendo is not practiced to hurt others and alot of people don't realize they are hurting people until somebody says something. Occasional misses and bruises are fine but bruises all the time and usually the same people hitting you hard. You should say something to them or maybe your seniors or Sensei. Hopefully you don't have any guys that you have to hit harder before they get the point.

          Comment


          • #6
            As Toshiro said before I would be concerned about your kote not providing adequate protection. Sometimes when the padding gets old it separates a little and your knuckles are more prone to bruising, at least that was the case with mine. If it's just your forearm as others have said try a pad, I use a tennis wrist band to help sometimes. Other than that hope you get a good person for jigeiko and drills. I know there is one person at my dojo that I swear he thinks the top of my forearm is kote, I don't think he has ever hit my kote come to think of it.

            Comment


            • #7
              My gut reaction is to say wear those bruises with pride as a symbol of your hard work and dedication to kendo! If they really are unsightly, apply some sort of skin colored make up to hide them, just be sure to hide the compact to avoid any further rumors going around the office.

              Kidding aside, ice your arm when you get home (10 minutes on, 10 minutes off, repeat as needed). Some say using this stuff helps speed up the healing time but I'm somewhat skeptical. Other sources say eating plenty of leafy greens and assorted fruits and veggies help because they replenish any nutrients you may be low on and that will allow your body to focus on healing the damage.

              Just a couple questions for the OP, where on your arm are you getting the bruises? Are they appearing under the kote or farther up your arm? Are they consistently in the same general area or randomly scattered?

              Comment


              • #8
                I've occasionally got bruises but probably have one only time gotten bruises severe as the ones you described. The guy didn't know he was hitting really hard and he missed alot during the 10 minutes or so we did jigeiko. He also had a repuation for hitting hard and very little control. Although he is a very nice guy when you get that reputation people tend to avoid practing with you. So letting them know is for their benefit too. I've only seen a few cases where people didn't want to listen. Even one case where the person went on to really hurt an older gentlemen and was eventually banned from practing at that club.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JSchmidt View Post
                  So how can they learn?. In those cases, I move my kote out of the way and let them hit the floor. Usually they lose balance as well and it's a much easier way of getting the point across.
                  I've done that, too, but I typically only offer unsolicited advice to kohai in my own club. If someone asks me for feedback, I'll tell them if they're hitting too hard or too soft. Otherwise, I figure it's up to them to work on their swing, and up to me to protect my health where necessary. Sometimes people do notice, and ask why I'm not letting them hit my kote. Then I have a teachable moment, but otherwise I save my breath (I usually need it).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Arnica Gel works well in taking the colour out of brusies.
                    You can pick it up from most chemists/phamarcies

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just bought a $5 kote pad from e-bogu a few months ago and it's done wonders for hits that land on target (it actually offers more protection than the kote itself). Before I had the pad, though, I noticed that tightening the draw strings (don't know the right word) on my kote a little made a really big difference. Not too sure why, but having the target closer to my wrist arm significantly reduced the pain I had there.

                      Now if I could just get everyone to hit the target... haha, might be getting hypocritical there.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        as stated, what kote's are u using? if it is a big stitching, like 6 mm, you might feel more then you would with a tighter stitch. The age matters a lot too. Or you could just be getting hit by other beginners who are hitting way to hard.
                        It could be just me, but I have the impression my right wrist is not bruising as easily anymore as it used to. When I first started in bogu, kote hits would hurt really bad, even with a kote protector. After a while, I decided to bite the bullet and practice without the protector. after a while It stopped hurting and bruising. so it could be that your wrist gets used to the pounding, but I'm no doctor.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the advice,
                          Ill try a wrist protector for the time being and maybe some of that Arnica stuff.
                          To answer the questions, its exactly the opposite, meaning I get bruises after practicing with the more advanced students. We remained more girls and than guys from all the beginners and we dont hit each other very hard (its kind of funny if you think about it) especially the girls try to hit correct and sometimes the hit are really, really soft (its probably a bad thing)
                          On my last session of training I was practicing with a guy that its slightly more advanced than us and yes he hit me very hard (he doesnt seem to know the difference between kote and my arm and he probably never hit the target right -and yes I told him he hit really hard, and I know he will not do it again-I hope so -)
                          And to clear the problem the kote are really old, I have no clue what stitching they have but we (beginners) use mostly second-hand gear so a new set of kote is on top of my shopping list (after the tripod, new filter for my camera, the credit card, etc )
                          Guess there is no magical cure for bruises
                          Thanks
                          Definitely have to buy a new set of kote

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            wrist protection is always a good idea. ut fo what Ive heard, in the beginning bruises are always a problem, but with time youll get used to get hit in the forearm and bruises wont appear unless you get hit really hard (for what Ive heard).

                            anyway, in my personal opinion, I think that the standard kote doesnt protect very much the wrist part (better said it almost doesnt protect at all), I mean the part right in the joint between the hand protector and the forearm protector of the kote, so I use a wrist thing to cover it, but thats it, in the forearm where kote strike is supossed to hit, the kote should be enough, but if you have problems its ok to use some extra stuff.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Luckily, I don't bruise very easily, so I've not had too much trouble with kote. I've never used any extra protection. I get the stitching imprinted onto my wrist from time to time, but that's about it.

                              But if I may, I would suggest you check your grip if you're finding that receiving kote is painful. Make sure your wrists are turned in, and you keep your elbows tucked in. Also, your hand should be raised above your wrist, if you get what I mean... This way,
                              • you get a bit of gap betwen the kote and your wrist
                              • the weakest part of your wrist is not exposed
                              • your opponent's shinai lands across a larger area dispersing the energy more efficiently.

                              Also, make sure you don't offer up your kote as a target by moving your shinai too far to the left even during basics practice. I think it hurts less if the shinai lands almost along the kote tsutsu rather than across it.

                              It's difficult to say for sure why you have such a problem with bruising without seeing your practice; above is just a possibility. Hope you find a good way of not getting too badly bruised

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