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  • #16
    Dont spend your training time trying to learn too many techniques.
    Try to enter the shiai confident that you can at least do "small men" and/or "small kote". Its better to be good at a few strikes rather than be crap at a lot. Dont bother thinking that any 'trick' you have up your sleeve will work
    Last edited by Mako; 2nd September 2010, 01:39 PM.

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    • #17
      thanks for the link, and the info!!

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      • #18
        Always, ALWAYS make an impression that you are a strong and very dangerous opponent. I'm talking about the moment you enter shiaijo, the way you enter it, and also the sonkyo. If you are not a 90-years old grandma, don't do sonkyo like one.

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        • #19
          One sensei I respect deeply once said to me "Shiai strategy is easy; just win"

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          • #20
            Originally posted by rfoxmich View Post
            One sensei I respect deeply once said to me "Shiai strategy is easy; just win"
            +Rep for that! Such a simple, yet difficult strategy

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            • #21
              sweating a little before the shiai maybe good...just my 2 cents.
              It was cold and I hadn't warmed up enough...I just couldn't feel the weight in my legs when i began. guess that's y i lunged forward with my hands (and not the feet)...it was a clean debana kote.
              So the next time I did some crazy sonkyo suburis n stuff to get my legs pumped up before the shiai.

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              • #22
                If you go in to the Shiai and start to feel unfocused and nervous. Kiai! Kiai, kiai, kiai!!

                If boiled down, the two most important thing we learn in our dojo is Kiai and Zanshin. A STRONG Kiai can raise the flag on a weak Ippon. A weak Kiai can lose the flag on an otherwise good ippon. And as mentioned Zanshin. Be "the most noted player" of the two for the judges, then you will have it easier to get the flags.

                When yoo've attacked, don't just stop. Continue through the opponent, past the opponent.. bounce of him with a bodycrash (forgot the correct term), show the judges that YOU are in complete control and yell like it was the best ippon you have ever produced... and it will be flags up!

                But most of all, which is already mentioned... HAVE FUN and take every Shiai for what it is, an extremely good learning session.

                GANBATTE, daks and FAJTO FAJTO!

                [Note, this thread was originaly started a while ago now.. Have it been yet, how did it go?]

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                • #23
                  First few shiai will always be difficult/ uncomfortable and bewilding. Try not to go like a bat out of hell
                  and hit hit hit, this usually will get you no where and look messy. On the other hand moving around /back to much
                  because you may feel worried or overwhelmed is not good either. I agree with azyjka, try to look stronger than
                  you are, keep kamae, dont swing your shinai around alot. if your opponent comes let him/her impale themselves
                  on it. that will make them worry(with any luck) The hard part is recognizing when to hit, if it`s your first
                  shiai making openings is probably a skill you dont have yet. so hit strong, straight with good spirit(kiai)
                  be as confident as you can, it will show.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by sid View Post
                    sweating a little before the shiai maybe good...just my 2 cents.
                    It was cold and I hadn't warmed up enough...I just couldn't feel the weight in my legs when i began. guess that's y i lunged forward with my hands (and not the feet)...it was a clean debana kote.
                    So the next time I did some crazy sonkyo suburis n stuff to get my legs pumped up before the shiai.
                    Mostly, weak legs during competition comes from anxiety and poor diet.

                    These things help me 1) listening to music that pumps me up. 2) centering breaths: 16 second breath from your hara ( 6 seconds in hold for 4 seconds and 6 seconds out). 3) An early breakfast of a large bowl of rice & 90 mins before your first match, a bowl of cantelope. 4) a well-focused warmup, stretching, & positive self talk, and a bottle of water or gatorade after warmups. 5) Goodnight of sleep. i once read an article that said lack of sleep before a competition causes increased anxiety & muscle weakness--i have to find that article again.

                    don't get me wrong; building leg strength is great! but that will come in to play as you progress or enter long enchos! Lately, i have been going to shiai without doing any of these & performing poorly

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                    • #25
                      Think "shiai" - meaning focus on that - not only after getting your gear on, but on the way to the place. And as seen in that great video clip, when you turn, point your shinai at the opponent (not toward the sky unless aite's an attacking bird). Give it 150% but keep your posture - don't lean forward or avoid by bending, an incoming men strike. Good luck!

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                      • #26
                        Assuming you are shorter than most of the guys. Be sure to maintain good straight posture because you don't want to make yourself shorter by leaning forward. Try to use footwork and don't over rely on your arm or quick hands. Also focus on a couple things if you try to incorporate every pointer then you will be thinking too much.

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                        • #27
                          Thanks for all your info for back then everyone!! I ended up coming second, so I learned heaps that day
                          I've now been to my fair share of shiai! Love the adrenaline rush and sense of team spirit with all your buddies cheering for you!
                          Your advice was invaluable - thankyou.

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                          • #28
                            Congrats and good you enjoyed! BTW, were your opponents M or F? How'd you feel (if you can remember amid the rush) - was/were the female(s) tough or/and could you feel a difference (I mean not physically but for want of a better term, spiritually or energy-wise)?

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                            • #29
                              One thing I with people, the first shiai is that they follow through and even then it is random, just to get their husbands were held. If you try to save and continue with Zanshin, do not go overboard and turn sharp, so you're ready to defend themselves. Also, do not stop the second you get to see a flag, because for all you know, it's the only flag that was raised for the purpose would be. It is better, the struggles and Shinpan cry "Yame" to hold a few times, then enter a single point. And as others have said, have fun and not too much to live, if you win or lose. Enjoy it for what it is and watch the games whenever possible, especially the 3rd Dan and the upper division.

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