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Making a bokuto

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Kim Taylor
    Thanks for looking out for the old fart guys.
    Kim Taylor
    Glad to! Credit should go where credit is due, and by the way, thanks for writing that article - it's a great starting point for learning how to make bokken.

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    • #17
      Simple enough, tell me when you're coming and we'll do some MJER. I'm always up for practice, we don't need a seminar for that. ;-)

      Kim.



      Originally posted by chidokan
      I'd come but there is no MJER!!! shock horror!

      My wife is trying to con me into a trip to Canada next year... This will necessarily have to coincide with a seminar or I will sulk. A lot. Please advise suitable travel itinerary that includes Guelph..... and MJER...

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      • #18
        Actually, I'm kind of anxious for Metsuke's next posts: "The Essentials of Cold Fusion," and "How I Invented the Electric Guitar."

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        • #19
          Too busy extolling the virtues of the self-taught.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Nokori 3byo
            Actually, I'm kind of anxious for Metsuke's next posts: "The Essentials of Cold Fusion," and "How I Invented the Electric Guitar."
            Sorry, the article was downloaded off a fileshare server, it didn't say who wrote it, it came in 3 parts, and I posted them as they came, as I thought someone might be interested in using it, my bad.

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            • #21
              thanks Kim, I dread to think what type of mental wreck I'd turn into when missing training for more than three days in a row...

              I may even have to talk to that woman who lives in my house...

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Metsuke
                Sorry, the article was downloaded off a fileshare server, it didn't say who wrote it, it came in 3 parts, and I posted them as they came, as I thought someone might be interested in using it, my bad.
                Take the first sentance of the first post, put it into Google and you get (you guessed it) - Kim Taylor.

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                • #23
                  In all seriousness, some people worry that the internet and file servers are going to destroy copyright, but in actual fact, as demonstrated here, it's even harder to say these days that one isn't plagiarizing or violating copyright. Essays are easy to check, sources are easy to check if it's online in an open and easily accessible form.

                  Sort of the opposite of what one would intuitively think, trying to protect and hide your work will make it that much easier to have it appropriated.

                  Long ago I made the choice to put my stuff out there unprotected, and often without even a copyright notice on it. Some folks said I was unwise (to say the least) and that I was going to destroy the fabric of free enterprise. But what happened was that I got much more return personally and as an instructor (trying to spread the arts) by putting the stuff out there for everyone to benefit from, than trying to make a buck off it by direct sales.

                  Those who make the most from copyrights are, in many cases, not the creators of the work, but those corporations who buy the copyright later. And that I have a bit of a problem with, but that's another story for another day.

                  I should have added, by the way, for Tim that the GSJSA usually has "side classes" which often are pretty informative about the very sorts of things that seem to get discussed endlessly on these forums. So don't be shy about signing up folks, the class lineup includes Toda-ha Buko-ryu naginata, Katori Shinto Ryu, Kyudo, Jodo, Tanjo, Niten Ichiryu and a special Friday evening discussion on "secret training methods" of iaido instruction. I'll be discussing the use of the Sei Do Kai rope sword.

                  he he

                  Kim Taylor

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                  • #24
                    Kim, thanks for writing the stuff and sharing it. You might not know that the copyright laws changed some time ago and are not the way they were when we were coming up. It used to be that you got protection when you put it out or "published" it with the little c and/or the statutory notice. That is not the case anymore. it is protected at the moment it is fixed in a tangible medium.

                    Anyway, regardless of whether or not you put it out protected or unprotected the real issue is whether or not someone is trying to pass your stuff off as his own. It is insulting to us period.

                    Many people will now put their work out with a notice that you are free to use it so long as you 1) do not alter it, 2) do not sell it, 3) use it in it's entirety and/or 4) clearly state who is the author.

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                    • #25
                      Actually Kim, I have just acquired a kyudo bow and am making arrows etc as we speak... there is no way I am doing the shooting that takes about half an hour a shot however....Heki ryu may suit me better! A bowyer friend is on with copying the carbon bow shape into a bamboo laminate for us to play with...

                      I would be quite interested in the 'side classes' and could certainly throw some iai training methods your way I guess... my current favourite is the 'nabiki' cutting practise to strengthen up the back muscles, along with the 'show beginners how swords should cut' by holding a bokken by the kissaki...
                      not this year as I am already committed to various projects and time does not permit. Next year however....

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                      • #26
                        *ahem* i use 5 tools (possibly six if u count a hand saw) a short chisel for shaping the chamfers on the mune, a paring chisel for the tsuka, 2 spokes shaves (50 quid might i add) are for the shaping.

                        im trying to use as many different kinds of wood i can get my hands on, so far ive done 3 from birds eye maple, 2 from american white oak another 2 on english oak, 3 from american white ash, a purple heart a green heart which i snapped to see hw much it could take and it took alot, and one from european white beach, i snapped all three of my ash ones beacause i didnt like them and they were taking up space.

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                        • #27
                          no router? or hacksaw? thats not real bokken making
                          welcome back by the way. how was cymru?

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                          • #28
                            no routers, hacksaws are for metal my dear

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ukenagashi
                              *ahem* i use 5 tools (possibly six if u count a hand saw) a short chisel for shaping the chamfers on the mune, a paring chisel for the tsuka, 2 spokes shaves (50 quid might i add) are for the shaping.

                              im trying to use as many different kinds of wood i can get my hands on, so far ive done 3 from birds eye maple, 2 from american white oak another 2 on english oak, 3 from american white ash, a purple heart a green heart which i snapped to see hw much it could take and it took alot, and one from european white beach, i snapped all three of my ash ones beacause i didnt like them and they were taking up space.
                              Indeed - I was looking at Spokeshaves here and they are $$$$

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                              • #30
                                how much is a quid in real money?

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