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  • Shims for saya...

    Just wondering if anyone knows where to get shims close to saya size or do I have to whittle one by hand( I know your supposed to use Ho tree,Magnolia), but my Iaito is do-do...so I'm thinking pine unless someone sells them.
    Thanx, Mike

  • #2
    The easiest way to shim your saya is to purchase cabinet veneer from the nearest large hardware store. It comes in a roll and they usually have oak and birch. Get birch as oak is bad for swords (so is pine). Look at your koiguchi to determine if it is loose because of poor nukitsuke (wallowed out the ha side) or from just wood compression (koiguchi is still fairly even all the way around). This will determine if you cut a piece to fit in the mune or ha side of the koiguchi. Once you have the piece fit properly, heat a metal instrument such as a screwdriver, and press it hard against the veneer. This activates the heat sensitive glue backing. Place the sword back into the saya and seat firmly. Leave it there for a couple of minutes until the glue backing is set. If it doesn't fit tightly enough, repeat on the opposite side of the koiguchi. If it is too tight, carefully file a little at a time until it fits correctly. Never use sandpaper inside a saya.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pgsmith
      The easiest way to shim your saya is to purchase cabinet veneer from the nearest large hardware store. It comes in a roll and they usually have oak and birch.
      called "edge banding"

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      • #4
        called "edge banding"
        Sheesh!
        You lawyers have to be so exacting!

        I never did know what it was really called.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by pgsmith
          The easiest way to shim your saya is to purchase cabinet veneer from the nearest large hardware store. It comes in a roll and they usually have oak and birch. Get birch as oak is bad for swords (so is pine). Look at your koiguchi to determine if it is loose because of poor nukitsuke (wallowed out the ha side) or from just wood compression (koiguchi is still fairly even all the way around). This will determine if you cut a piece to fit in the mune or ha side of the koiguchi. Once you have the piece fit properly, heat a metal instrument such as a screwdriver, and press it hard against the veneer. This activates the heat sensitive glue backing. Place the sword back into the saya and seat firmly. Leave it there for a couple of minutes until the glue backing is set. If it doesn't fit tightly enough, repeat on the opposite side of the koiguchi. If it is too tight, carefully file a little at a time until it fits correctly. Never use sandpaper inside a saya.
          Nice, thanx alot Paul. Mike

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ignatz
            called "edge banding"
            Got ya thanx Ignatz, Mike

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by pgsmith
              The easiest way to shim your saya is to purchase cabinet veneer from the nearest large hardware store. It comes in a roll and they usually have oak and birch. Get birch as oak is bad for swords (so is pine). Look at your koiguchi to determine if it is loose because of poor nukitsuke (wallowed out the ha side) or from just wood compression (koiguchi is still fairly even all the way around). This will determine if you cut a piece to fit in the mune or ha side of the koiguchi. Once you have the piece fit properly, heat a metal instrument such as a screwdriver, and press it hard against the veneer. This activates the heat sensitive glue backing. Place the sword back into the saya and seat firmly. Leave it there for a couple of minutes until the glue backing is set. If it doesn't fit tightly enough, repeat on the opposite side of the koiguchi. If it is too tight, carefully file a little at a time until it fits correctly. Never use sandpaper inside a saya.
              Thanx again PGSmith, got it done today w/ no hassels. Now I actually get to pop out the Iaito with my thumb, instead of holding it in for safty.
              Mike

              Comment


              • #8
                Saya shims

                I find that a strip of Bamboo works far better.

                Yes, you have to glue it in place and may need to "file" it more so that it is not too tight, but as a material it is far tougher than most materials.

                Britt Nichols

                Comment


                • #9
                  I find that a strip of Bamboo works far better.
                  Hey Britt,
                  The problem that I have found with bamboo, is the fact that it has a very high silica content. That's what makes it tougher. The problem is that silica is very hard. I have seen a copper habaki get a groove worn into it from a piece of bamboo used as a saya shim. Since veneer is so easy to replace, I prefer to replace it as often as needed since it won't mar the habaki at all.

                  Just my choice though. There's a dozen different ways to do just about any of this stuff. Glad it worked out for you Mike.

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                  • #10
                    glad you got it sorted mike.
                    i use waterclolour paper...
                    and everythings held together by safety pins so no need for glue

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rottunpunk
                      glad you got it sorted mike.
                      i use waterclolour paper...
                      and everythings held together by safety pins so no need for glue
                      Thanx Rottun,
                      Those damn punkers try to hold every damn thing together with safty pins.

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                      • #12
                        they tend to be readily available. and more water resistant (for use on fixing clothes) than gaffer tape

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