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  • #31
    Originally posted by Havamal View Post
    What is "JSA"? Japanese Sword Art?
    Yes, that's exactly what it means. Sorry for not clarifying earlier.

    Originally posted by Havamal View Post
    Yes, I will buy the best bogu that I can, within reason and guidance of my sensei.

    When I feel that I have a very basic understanding of Kendo, I would like add Iaido practice, but that maybe a while, as I plan now to always cross-train in karate.

    Today, I am just very curious about Iaido, but eventually would like to buy a shinken at the appropriate time.
    It's all well and good to be curious about iaido but don't jump the gun and start thinking about a shinken just yet. Once you actually start iaido, your first step is to look at iaito. I personally would only start considering purchasing a shinken after receiving permission from my sensei. The last thing you want to do is buy a sharp hunk of junk that is a personal disaster/dismemberment waiting to happen.

    Originally posted by Havamal View Post
    Mind does wander, but my body will focus on traditional MMA and then Kendo.
    Not to digress from the original intent of this thread, but there's nothing traditional about MMA, it's nothing more than a couple guys beating the crap out of each other with techniques that have been cherry picked from assorted martial arts for no conceivable reason other than that people will pay to watch a mindless brawl. If you meant to say "traditional MA" then why do you separate that from kendo?
    Last edited by ShinKenshi; 22nd October 2010, 12:53 AM.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by ShinKenshi View Post
      Not to digress from the original intent of this thread, but there's nothing traditional about MMA, it's nothing more than a couple guys beating the crap out of each other with techniques that have been cherry picked from assorted martial arts for no conceivable reason other than that people will pay to watch a mindless brawl. If you meant to say "traditional MA" then why do you separate that from kendo?
      To me, MMA is a prize fighting (for money for pro's or for medals for amatuers) sport such as like Boxing, Kickboxing, or Wrestling.

      For me, "traditional MMA" is just karate and judo (or jujitsu/jiujitsu/BJJ), to polish my mind foremost and, in the unlikely event that prevention fails, to use when I am out of bullets and choose not to run away when my loved ones are in danger, so to speak.

      I am entering Kendo mainly to experience joy and perhaps let others feel wonderful about beating me during competition.
      Last edited by Havamal; 22nd October 2010, 01:08 AM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Havamal View Post
        To me, MMA is a prize fighting (for money for pro's or for medals for amatuers) sport such as like Boxing, Kickboxing, or Wrestling.

        For me, "traditional MMA" is just karate and judo (or jujitsu/jiujitsu/BJJ), to polish my mind foremost and, in the unlikely event that prevention fails, to use when I am out of bullets and choose not to run away when my loved ones are in danger, so to speak.

        I am entering Kendo mainly to experience joy and perhaps let others feel wonderful about beating me during competition.
        I think you may be confusing acronyms here. MMA is a fairly new phenomenon and stands for mixed martial arts indicating that the individual has taken one or two techniques from several different martial arts whereas judo, jiujutsu, and BJJ don't borrow from other non related styles so can't be labeled as mixed martial arts and simply martial arts.

        Great to see you're so enthusiastic about kendo. Just beware of getting focused on competition at this early stage however and focus on improving yourself instead.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by ShinKenshi View Post
          I think you may be confusing acronyms here. MMA is a fairly new phenomenon and stands for mixed martial arts indicating that the individual has taken one or two techniques from several different martial arts whereas judo, jiujutsu, and BJJ don't borrow from other non related styles so can't be labeled as mixed martial arts and simply martial arts.

          Great to see you're so enthusiastic about kendo. Just beware of getting focused on competition at this early stage however and focus on improving yourself instead.
          I will agree that you and I do not agree about "MMA" or whatever: Moving on.

          Yes, of course, obviously, be proficient (and safe) first, then compete with guidance of my sensei/coach, since Kendo can be a m/a and a sport.

          One thing I like about Kendo (and Iaido): no silly belts to indicate presumed knowledge.
          Last edited by Havamal; 22nd October 2010, 02:16 AM.

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          • #35
            Does anyone have any tips on maintaining my Iaito? I've just recently recieved one as a gift and I'm unsure of how to maintain it effectively.

            Any advice will be much appreciated

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            • #36
              Just rub the blade off after practice with a lightly (choji) oiled cloth to remove fingerprints. Check it periodically for wear or cracks, and also loose fittings. In addition, you should re-read your own signature line about things that make the world go round.
              Good luck,
              Brad

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              • #37
                Hello everyone,

                Which type of blade is better on an Iaito, steel or Zinc/Aluminium alloy?
                I'm aware of the difficulty of getting steel blades through UK customs, but I'm just wondering which is superior regarding durability, staying in shape, etc.

                Thanks again,

                David

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                • #38
                  For beginners, I would recommend zinc aluminum alloy iaito from a reputable vendor. They are very durable and low maintenance. The "steel blades" you are looking at are probably too heavy and not well balanced for iai. Even if it's suitable for iai, you won't be able to get the benefit of using a steel blade/shinken as a beginner anyway.

                  If you stick with iai long enough, eventually you will graduate to a shinken. Exciting.

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                  • #39
                    Thanks Gordon
                    Thinking of buying one from Tozando, as I'm lead to believe they're a good supplier.

                    I've heard that zinc alloy blades can distort after several years of use, but this might just be truthless scaremongering...

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                    • #40
                      David, as advised before, show tim what you want before buying

                      He will tell you when you are ready for an iaito, so do not rush into things

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                      • #41
                        I have a friend (pilot) who regularly travels to Japan. Thinking of getting one brought back from Japan.....good idea? Save money / better iaito for same money....
                        If so, then who would be the best supplier of a decent beginner's iaito?

                        Many thanks.....

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                        • #42
                          Hello ps73

                          From personal experience. Your savings will be dependent on the exchange rate and the amount they charge for shipping. In general unless your pilot friend is fluent he may not be able to get you what you want. You can order iaitos directly from Japan, so then the only difference is shipping cost. Now if you are ordering a shinken, it is a royal pain to bring it back with you as you MUST obtain papers first.

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