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  • #16
    CHeers everyone(Y)
    its been a big help

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    • #17
      Cheers everyone
      It's been a big help in confusing me even more

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      • #18
        Speaking of which, got a ride home from a sempai tonight. Low and behold we had a conversation on merihari during the drive!
        Got confirmation that I am on the right track! However, how well my examples hold up --- shrugs shoulders!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Ookami7 View Post
          Speaking of which, got a ride home from a sempai tonight. Low and behold we had a conversation on merihari during the drive!
          Got confirmation that I am on the right track! However, how well my examples hold up --- shrugs shoulders!
          I'm going to have a chat with people about it this week and see what they can tell me.

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          • #20
            As an aside, I've heard merihari used (not in a budo context) as the ability to change focus completely when switching between tasks (if I understood what was being said to me).

            Anyhow good thread, from all contributors - Let's studying!

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            • #21
              Coming from a musical background the "modulation" meaning of merihari always made sense to me. My sensei usually uses it with a nuance of kind of an "eb and flow" and a sort of natural variation to your movement. As an aside I recently also saw the term used in a magazine here to describe a woman's body, in that case implying that the woman in question's body was too straight lined and boring (めりはりがない体), basically implying a lack of visually appealing "curvy"-ness.

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              • #22
                Merihari "lightbulb"

                I think I finally have my hands around Merihari. When I re-read all the prior posts I see that we are indeed talking about the right things. But the text in Japanese below was what gave me my Aha! Moment.  

                Merihari is used in kendo and iaido to explain how to not only use a variety of techniques but to commit fully to what you are doing. Do not do it "half way" Make your movements either fast or slow but don't muddle along with something in between. If it needs to be strong do it clearly strong, if it needs to be soft do it soft.

                Merihari is what keeps you from getting in a rut!


                --start--

                めり張り、Merihari

                「めり張り」とは、特に「剣道」や「居合道」だけに使われる言葉で はありません。
                Merihari is not only applied to kendo and iaido.

                「めり張り」という言葉は、「剣道」以外でも、一般的に使われています。
                Merihari is a phrase commonly used outside of kendo.

                「めり張り」の意味は、「中途半端になってはいけない」ということです。
                Meriharis meaning, is explained as don't do something halfway.

                つまり、「強い_弱い」、「早い_遅い」、「大きい_小さい」、「打つ_防ぐ」、「攻める_守る」というこ とを、はっきり行うことが 大切だということです。
                In other words you can say that it is important to perform clearly, strong or weak, fast or slow, big or small, strike or protect, attack or defend.

                また、「稽古」についても、休息が必要な時はしっかり休み、稽古をする時は集中してやることが大切というこ とです。
                In the case of, keiko practice, it is important that you really rest when it is breaktime, and really concentrate on keiko when you are practicing.

                例えば、「野球」の「投手」と同じです。
                It is exactly the same for a baseball pitcher.

                いくら優秀な投手でも、早いボールだけを投げ続けたのでは、いつか 打たれてしまいます。
                Against a great pitcher, who throws only fastballs, you can eventually get a hit.

                「早いボール」と「遅いボール」、「直球」と「変化球」、「外角と内角」を織り交ぜながら投げることが大切 ということです。
                It is important that one throws with a mixture of Fast balls and slow balls, straight balls and change ups. outside pitches and inside pitches, all woven together.

                --end--
                Note: translation errors are all mine. If someone can improve the English or correct a mis-understanding I welcome your comments.

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                • #23
                  Aha, if that is the case, then the definition I heard was a specific application of the term to a particular element of technique. That makes sense.

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                  • #24
                    Thanks Stroud Sensei!
                    Yup, this makes sense from how I have heard and read the translation/ ideas being kicked around here!

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                    • #25
                      and once more...

                      Jack

                      Jushin as in Jushin-ryu is the central core art from which MJER is derived and is supposedly the direct art from Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu. Just like MJER it remained a considerably unchanged art and at it's core practitioners retain the tradition of keppan when inducing new students.

                      Nakayama Hakudo Sensei, on the basis that he wasn't allowed to openly teach Jushin, combined Jushin Ryu with MJER to create Muso Shinden Ryu (or in support of my argument on the koryu thread - made some modifications of one art and renamed it ).

                      Merihari, as I understand it, is purposeful control over the contrasts that exist within movement. Kankyukyojaku describe what those extremes are but merihari is the operation of those contrasts as so many on this thread have already described. I think Musashi's description of Ox's Neck Rat's Tail is of the same ilk.

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