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Seitei kata #3 uke-nagashi

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  • Seitei kata #3 uke-nagashi

    I am curious about the noto for this kata. The thumb on the right hand is pointing toward the kashira instead of pointing towards the tsuba as is the usual method during noto. What is the historical/practical reason for this style of noto? It seems to me to be somewhat dangerous since I don't see how one could draw and cut effectively from this reversed position.

    Someone please educate me...

  • #2
    hi ,


    i dont think im going to answer your question...but i think its a practical reason... if we are training this kata is because some one used this kata and survived to tell the next generation ....

    in my opinion the noto is very usefull because you can hit the kote from diferents angles or hit the opponent throat


    ( sorry about my english )

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Ben F.
      I am curious about the noto for this kata. The thumb on the right hand is pointing toward the kashira instead of pointing towards the tsuba as is the usual method during noto. What is the historical/practical reason for this style of noto? It seems to me to be somewhat dangerous since I don't see how one could draw and cut effectively from this reversed position.

      Someone please educate me...
      Ben you have to remember that the seitei version is a modern (late 1960's) bastardisation of the original Koryu Uke nagashi. I think it was derived from 3 different koryu those being Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu, Eishin Ryu and Hoki ryu. I think there are a few people on this forum that practice these ryu that could give you a answer. It would be interesting to see if they give the same answer and if seitei complied with any of them.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Richie224
        Ben you have to remember that the seitei version is a modern (late 1960's) bastardisation of the original Koryu Uke nagashi.
        I think your term is highly inappropriate.


        I think it was derived from 3 different koryu those being Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu, Eishin Ryu and Hoki ryu. I think there are a few people on this forum that practice these ryu that could give you a answer. It would be interesting to see if they give the same answer and if seitei complied with any of them.
        The hand position for this chiburi is similar to that found in both MJER and MSR.
        Last edited by FastEd; 10th December 2003, 07:12 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Ben F.
          I am curious about the noto for this kata. The thumb on the right hand is pointing toward the kashira instead of pointing towards the tsuba as is the usual method during noto. What is the historical/practical reason for this style of noto? It seems to me to be somewhat dangerous since I don't see how one could draw and cut effectively from this reversed position.

          Someone please educate me...
          This is my interpretation of your question.
          Firsly, if you attempted Noto with the grip you have after positioning the Kisaki behind your knee the blade would have to move from your right knee to above your left shoulder.
          Now lets consider Zan Shin in this movement. In this instant, your opponent is on the ground and your focus must be alert about him/her. Using the grip from positioning your Kisaki behind your knee would cause the blade to move up and away from him/her, thus braking Zan Shin. Re-gripping enables you to have active control of your Kisaki in the event that he/she was to attack further, you can either attempt a Tsuki (a thrust) or a cut with the right grip.
          If you imagine your opponent attacking you at this stanza of the kata when you practice and try to counter his/her movement with the two grips you may understand what I mean.
          Hope it helps

          Comment


          • #6
            The gyakute grip is no hindrance to proper reaction, if you are attacked. If you consider the techniques in jodo for example, several are done with a gyakute grip. Even though we are speaking of a jo, lots of the efficiency apply to using the sword as well. You can also do nice kirioroshi with a gyakutegrip. If you are attacked at the moment you place your right hand "gyakute-wise", you can step in with the right foot catch the opponents underarms with the monouchi, cut through, change grip, and slice him downwards to the right with a killing kesa-cut. and then do chiburui and noto in peace, quietness and serenity.

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