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  • #16
    Originally posted by rottunpunk View Post
    Forgot to add....
    Iwata sensei states that if you do gihou properly with a real situation in mind, it will have aji, and as a consequence it will change from the standard way depending on how tekki reacts...
    What's gihou?

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    • #17
      Interesting post rottun, recently at work the subject of combative flow has been discussed for fighter pilots, and how their training enables them to make clear concise decisions, to deal with multiple targets efficiantly and with restrained effort, and important not to allow an overflow of emotions to be detrimental to combat effectiveness, whilst replicating this in iai is difficult, i find once in a while to look at combat or athletes regimes a possible supplement that maybe added to iai...just my 2p

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      • #18
        Gihou is technique from what i am interpreting (could be wrong.)

        Interesting point mr zenith. I have not thought of this side of things. I guess nowadays there is more of a mental approach to armed forces training as well to enable them to cope with a 'real' situation.

        The lack of a real opponent, I feel, is certainly a holdback in iai.
        Tameshigiri mats arent all that threatening and tend not to move about much. Invisible people can end up doing wierd things on account of being hard to see, and I am not at a stage in either niten or the kenjutsu side of Jikiden to be able to have the feeling of reacting to an unknown attack (apart from when i forget which one i am doing).

        But a small point more on the 'fighting'. We have a tekki, or an opponent.
        Iwata sensei writes that they are hostile, or unjustly hauling one off etc. (exceptions being Kaishaku - different feeling in the kata anyways, and Sodome - where they are tied up, but still an enemy).
        If doing iai is not 'fighting' then surely the opponent is not hostile or an enemy and we are slaying innocent people who obligingly but unwillingly make movements which can be percieved as an attack thus enabling us to act in certain movements on them...or it's just dancing, and in anycase all those hachidan hanshi have got it worng these past years

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        • #19
          Nobody got it wrong. What I'm saying is the words you are using can be variously interpreted. I don't think your interpretation on this occasion is the one most helpful to understanding what you are doing.

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          • #20
            hmmn, i do have a lot to learn after all...partly why i asked the original question.

            But thinking of the riai/bunkai feels as though it adds 'flavour'.

            I was curious as to how seniors have come to add it.

            Apart from being a natrual developement, it must come from a persons state of mind when doing the waza..or does it?

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            • #21
              Originally posted by rottunpunk View Post
              ... it must come from a persons state of mind when doing the waza..or does it?
              Exactly that, and correct technique combined with timing. Fighting spirit, most people consider to been looking and feeling like you're having a fight, which usually includes frowning, head forwards, etc. Fighting spirit is timing, nothing more.

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              • #22
                hahahaha, just catching up on this one.... I had her playing around with her timing tonight... for precisely the reasons listed.

                If you examine any waza, you should ask what makes it 'work', as opposed to 'not work' as a 'combative system'. Unfortunately Peter has already mentioned the main ingredient, but we should let the rest of you work the others out...too much spoonfeeding goes against the grain for me...

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                • #23
                  Hi Tim, I understand what you mean, but I believe that explaining it in words sometimes weeds out the students with potential. Those that think they understand something because it has been explained are the ones with the highest hurdles to jump. Those that think the words explain nothing other than pointing to where they must look are the ones who have potential.

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                  • #24
                    In that case I will say I need to see her tekki....

                    It is a difficult balance, to guide rather than lead by the nose as it were... For senior students, I tend to ask "what does such and such sensei do that you don't?, i.e. why do you like that iai and why is it better than yours?"

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                    • #25
                      Everyone wants to run before they learn to walk. Everyone wants the secret of how to do this or that (aji, meri hari, kigurai and other such amazing skills).

                      This is good. We need to see amazing demonstrations of skill and we need to assume we will learn them in the next three weeks before the test.

                      But the reality is that there aren't so much secrets as things that have to be learned before other things can be learned (walking before running is good). There are Japanese words that can be roughly translated as "experience", in that "For 7dan the candidate should show experience and the effects of long hard training".

                      And some actually do.

                      Questions are good. I like questions, but sometimes the actual answer is "practice" and it's not just a way for sensei to put you off because he doesn't want to give you a secret or because he doesn't know.

                      Student: Sensei, how can I make my iaido look so smooth, effective and sharp that it appears that I've been practicing for thirty years?

                      Sensei: Practice for thirty years maybe?

                      Kim.

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                      • #26
                        On the fighting thing, think about Mae/Shohatto/Mae what sort of "fighting" is going on there? We cut them across the face or chest and then split them from top to bottom. There's no "fighting" there is there? It's just chopping them up before they even get their swords out.

                        Where's the fighting?

                        When you define that for yourself you are quite a long way down the road... no let me rephrase that. How you define that is a good indication of how far down the road you are.

                        Kim.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Kim Taylor View Post
                          Student: Sensei, how can I make my iaido look so smooth, effective and sharp that it appears that I've been practicing for thirty years?

                          Sensei: Practice for thirty years maybe?
                          I like that answer. So simple; so true.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Kim Taylor View Post
                            On the fighting thing, think about Mae/Shohatto/Mae what sort of "fighting" is going on there?


                            you're talking about fighting in a iwaza where both are sitting too close to attack if the opponent didn't fell asleep? Attachment
                            Attached Files

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by RC_Kenshi View Post
                              I like that answer. So simple; so true.
                              BS I think

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Jason Anstey View Post
                                BS I think
                                Please elaborate. What do you think is BS? The original answer, or my response?

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