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  • Tsunami Paul Chen

    Anyone tried the Tsunami from the hanwei forgery for Iaido? I'm using a bokken now but want to buy a live blade. Or is there a better blade (that i can use for cutting to) which doesn't cost as much as a new car?

    Regards,

    Louis

    www.uiteindhoven.nl

  • #2
    if you have only used a bokken in the past i would strongly suggest that you dont use a live bladed instrument for your practice (loss of fingers). use an IAITO instead, they are still exelent swords but not as sharp. hanwei produce iaitos to a high quaity. check out this web site for some grate photos of the hanwei paul chen nami iaito http://www.888knivesrus.com/product/CASNAMI .

    But if you do want a cheap but strong and durable live blade then check out the hanwei paul chen practical katana - cheep but very nice http://www.888knivesrus.com/product/PC1070GT
    Last edited by FRAGMASTER; 17th June 2004, 07:48 PM.

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    • #3
      Sounds like he wants to practice tameshigiri, in which case he should really check with his Sensei. Tameshigiri should not be practiced by people without proper instruction.

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      • #4
        Both

        Dear all,

        I want to practice both and I go to a dojo for the iaido bit. They don't practice tameshigiri in our dojo (yet). I won't start swinging a lethal weapon arround without proper exercise, don't worry about that. First of all i want to use it for iaido but i don't want to buy a blunt iaito (which are rather expensive to) just to find myself buying a shinken in a couple of months (which will cost about the same). I just wondered if the balance/weight of the Tsunami is good enough for iaido.

        Regards,

        Louis

        p.s. Just in case, are there any finger protectors ?

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        • #5
          I trained Iai for 5 years before being told it was time to purchase a shinken. I doubt it will be a matter of months, but again this is a question for your sensei.

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          • #6
            beginners with shinken scare the hell out of me, you dont know where its going next, and half the time they aint looking to see where its going either. We have banned them from mixed grade seminars, unless you are doing embu in the middle of the hall by yourself. People sometimes just seem to forget they are in a room full of swords swinging about....and wander around as if on a stroll in the park.
            Personally I recommend people to buy an iaito, then save up to buy a nice personalised one when they visit Japan. This does two things...first of all it shows a commitment to learning, and secondly allows them to go through a lot larger selection and choose something that they really like the look of and has a good balance, as they can try them all out and not just end up with what comes through the post.
            It also stops swords ending up in the wrong hands when someone just turns up, buys a sword, then decides he doesnt like iaido and just sells the blade to any local idiot who fancies a sword...

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            • #7
              Training alone

              Hi there,

              As i practice kendo (haven't been last month due to work) and the training times with iaido overlap eachother (same dojo) I can train iaido only for 1 hour a week. This is in the dojo and i'm using the bokken there. It doesn't have a scabbard so it's kind of crap. I'm planning to use the Tsunami at home or when i have to stay over in a hotel (in my room, don't worry, I'll try to avoid the lobby). Trying to pick up one kata each week at the dojo to practice that one the rest of the week in my spare time. I'm almost 31 and was in the army and eventually in the former yugoslavia for three years during the war. So don't be affraid that I'm dangerous in the presence of lethal weapons. Was just trying to figure out how the balance was on the Tsunami.

              Regards,

              Louis

              Comment


              • #8
                What does your sensei say about getting a shinken? As I mentioned, it took me a good 5 years of training on average 4 to 5 hours a week to get to a point to where I wouldn't cut my fingers off during nukitsuke and noto. Another problem for beginners with shinken is that it can teach you a lot of bad habbits. Your so busy trying to do noto and nukitsuke without cutting something off, that you alter the form in an attempt to make it safer. That's just not a good way to train. Training on iaito will allow you to work on your form without worrying about finishing the day with all your fingers still attached. Then when you're form is pretty solid, switching to a shinken is a relatively straightforward affair, consisting of a few scary months where you have to learn to trust what you've learned over the past several years.

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                • #9
                  Scared

                  That's one of the reasons why i wanted to buy a shinken. I've read many articles about people that started out with an iaito that really had to get used to the shinken (weight, sharpness etc.) Thought I could skip them months by using a shinken from the beginning. I already ordered the Tsunami, but i'll practice with my bokken for the comming time (its still crap without a scabbard).

                  If i go real slow on the movements with the shinken don't you think that the proper technique can be learned? As soon as the technique is there I can try and speed up the movements?

                  Anyway they are just to expensive to buy both (for me at the moment). And i wanna do some tameshigiri also in a few months.

                  My sensei didn't like the idear of me waving a shinken arround very much (especially not in class).

                  Guess I shouldn't but I did.

                  Story of my life

                  Regards,

                  Louis

                  p.s. I still would like to know if these Tsunamies are properly balanced.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What's the rush? You go a duel coming up? And no I don't really think that going slow is gonna make what you want to do possible. There are some things in life you just can't rush. You gotta pay your dues like everyone else. This is one of those thing. You will need to go really slow with an iaito to get the techniques down, much less a shinken.

                    If your sensei doesn't think you should, then you sure as heck shouldn't. Alienating one's sensei is a good way to end up out on the street with no instruction. Then how will you fix yoru technique?

                    Go to Swordstore.com. Longterm you're gonna want an iaito anyway. There are just some days when you want to train, that you just don't feel up to a shinken. Perhaps there are too many people around, perhaps you just don't feel good and done want to worry about severing the thumb on your left hand, because you got careless and let it slip off the saya a bit during nukitsuke.

                    Patience is part of the training.

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                    • #11
                      One thing about the Paul Chen Tsunami is that it's definitely beautiful. I was checking it out at a knife store a couple weekends ago. It's pretty much another Practical Katana with better fittings, a slightly better balance, and thicker blade. It's just so expensive because of the fittings and probably because of the thicker blade. I haven't cut with it yet, but I cut with my Practical Plus Katana at a tameshigiri seminar last month May. I imagine that cutting with the Tsunami may feel similar since the 2 swords are built similar. The sensei who ran the seminar told me that the Tsunami cuts very well when I emailed him about it. I may get it in the future simply for tameshigiri and as an nice display piece on my sword rack in between tameshigiri sessions. But I think I'll be ordering a Bugei sword first before dropping any cash on the Tsunami. I just want the Tsunami simply for it's fittings.

                      As for a live blade for Iaido practice, as a beginner I would be against it. Drawing and sheathing would be dangerous still. There's another beginner in my class that's using his Paul Chen Practical Katana. He's often cutting his fingers when drawing and sheathing and bleeding from it. I would take Charles Mahan's advice. I only use an Iaito for Kata practice. I save the Shinken for actually cutting sessions. Since you already ordered it, don't use it for Iaido practice yet. Just get yourself a sword rack and display it for now. Invest in a nice Iaito from www.swordstore.com or www.bugei.com. You'll still get alot of enjoyment from practicing with an Iaito. Just be patient and wait til your sensei tells you to switch to a Shinken. Practicing patience is a virtue of Iaido right? If you rush to use a Shinken for kata practice, then you wouldn't be developing the patience needed from Iaido.
                      Last edited by Ren Blade; 18th June 2004, 11:03 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Aight, i'm convinced

                        Ok,

                        I guess you guys are right (looking at my thumb makes me shiver at the moment) . I'll leave the Tsunami on the wall for now. Damn, I was really looking forward swinging the thing arround and kill some bats meanwhile.

                        I'll get myself a shitty Iaito from a local shop and use that for now. I guess I don't need a 400euro/$ one just for practice. Hope my sensei will share that feeling as i'm out off cash at the moment (payed for the Tsunami and my summer holiday). I've seen display katana's for about 40euro/$, the fittings seemed to be pretty sturdy (2 bamboo pegs and a full tang construction).

                        Thanks for the advice, not really what I hoped for but probably for the best.

                        Yours faithfully,

                        Louis

                        www.uiteindhoven.nl

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That sounds suspiciously like a 440 stainless wallhanger. These are not at all suited to practice. They are just too brittle. They are made to hang on a wall and that's about it. Check http://www.swordstore.com and http://www.bugei.com Also get your sensei's advice on these as well. A blade that snaps midswing and pins your sensei to the wall is not a good way to curry favor with sensei, or the other students for that matter.


                          I notice your in the Netherlands. I know this is a silly question, but budo communities tend to me small places... You wouldn't happen to know Wout Verschueren would you? He's a Godan Iaido instructor in Melsbroek, Belgium http://www.eishin-ryu.be/
                          Last edited by Charles Mahan; 18th June 2004, 11:53 PM.

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                          • #14
                            You shouldn't have rushed to buy the Tsunami if that's all the cash you had. For less amount you can get a low end Iaito from www.swordstore.com or www.bugei.com. Also like Charles Mahan said, a cheap stainless steel Iaito is not the way to go. Stainless steel can snap cause the material is brittle. Aside from a piece breaking from your stainless steel blade and it flying or flipping at your sensei stabbing him/her or other classmates practicing, the broken piece could flip back at you and stab yourself and there'll be nothing you can do about it. Invest a few hundred dollars on a nice Iaito from swordstore or bugei. When I said you'll still get enjoyment out of practicing with an Iaito, I meant with a good Iaito from the previously mentioned websites. You'll get no enjoyment out of a stainless steel Iaito that will break and unintentionally hurt or kill someone or yourself in class. The good Iaitos are made from aluminum/zinc and those are stronger and will last for years. Of course never hit anything with it, but at least they won't snap from just being swung or accidentally hitting something hard around you. And these good Iaitos can run around $350 - $400.00 plus for a low end model. So you shouldn't have made the mistake of ordering an expensive Shinken first before investing in an Iaito. For now, don't get a stainless steel Iaito (crappy Iaitos), and just use your bokken for now til you have saved up for a quality Iaito from swordstore or bugei. And let your Tsunami hang on the wall for the meantime til you are instructed by your sensei to use a live blade.

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                            • #15
                              If you need a cheap iaito your best bet is to buy from this ebayer's store:

                              http://stores.ebay.com/Gichudo_W0QQsspagenameZl2QQtZkm

                              I know 7 people (myself and 6 others) that own swords from this shop and are extremely sattisfied with the quality and the shipping. Also since the euro is strong right now it will be fairly cheap for you so you really can't go wrong with one of his swords.

                              Edit: Also his available swords are always rotating on the site so your best bet is to email him directly with what you are looking for and take a look at his entire selection available to him before making a purchase.

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