Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
sword length?? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • sword length??

    This may be a repeat but i couldn't find the answer...

    How does one find out how long a sword should be for them? I have heard a couple different things, but I figured I would check and see if you guys and gals had any input.. thanks

  • #2
    I thought shinai only come in 38 and 39 for adults. For real sword so long as you don't cut yourself while using it i think it's right for you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Depends on the school. However your best bet is to hold the sword/a yard stick down to your side as you would a sword (pointing it down) and the tip should be about 1 inch from the floor.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by FundaTW
        This may be a repeat but i couldn't find the answer...

        How does one find out how long a sword should be for them? I have heard a couple different things, but I figured I would check and see if you guys and gals had any input.. thanks
        For you, since you are 22, according to the All Japan Kendo Federation, you should have a 39 in.

        I don't have to booklet with me, but I know for males 18 and older 39in. is regulation shiai size. But that's just shiai, other wise use what you like I suppose.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Pan-Chan
          For you, since you are 22, according to the All Japan Kendo Federation, you should have a 39 in.

          I don't have to booklet with me, but I know for males 18 and older 39in. is regulation shiai size. But that's just shiai, other wise use what you like I suppose.
          Sword - not shinai.

          Why do you want to know the correct length of sword?
          Are you are buying one via an online shop?

          Originally posted by Reikon
          Depends on the school. However your best bet is to hold the sword/a yard stick down to your side as you would a sword (pointing it down) and the tip should be about 1 inch from the floor.
          Reikon is about right, then just measure from the tsuba to to the tip, that will give you a guide.

          Also the length of iaito or shinken for practice purposes will depend on your experience level. The more experienced - the longer it may be.
          Reason is that until you can perform saya-biki correctly, the sword can be difficult to place correctly to re-sheathe.

          Comment


          • #6
            ... and I forgot to add that a sword that is too long can also inhibit the correct noto technique, where you place the sword tip in the koiguchi (mouth of the saya)

            R)

            Comment


            • #7
              I think the guy is asking about a suggested length for iaito, not shinai.

              Click on measure your blade

              Comment


              • #8
                Depends on the school. However your best bet is to hold the sword/a yard stick down to your side as you would a sword (pointing it down) and the tip should be about 1 inch from the floor.
                Just a reminder... This advice would be extremely bad at our dojo. If I did this my iaito would have to be 2 to 3 inches shorter than it is. I don't think I would be allowed to train with something so short. The reason being that without a long sword, it is extremely difficult to ever get saya-biki correct. At least correct to MJER ideals. This is really a question your sensei should answer.
                Last edited by Charles Mahan; 3rd November 2004, 12:35 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Charles Mahan
                  This advice would be extremely bad at our dojo. If I did this my iaito would have to be 2 to 3 inches shorter than it is. I don't think I would be allowed to train with something so short. The reason being that without a long sword, it is extremely difficult to ever get saya-biki correct. At least correct to MJER ideals. This is really a question your sensei should answer.
                  Yep. Totally agree with Charles. That would also be too short at my dojo, where we practice MSR. This is a question you should be working out with your sensei.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    wow, lost of info... lets see...

                    kendoka..... Yes, I meant Iaito and or shinken
                    I want to get an Iaito in the next couple of months and the only place I have found them is on line (not many shops where I live and none have proper Iaito)

                    DCPan thanks for the link

                    Mr. Mahan,
                    I am just begining to learn, am having to try to figure it out myself, (and before I get my chops busted I looked for a school but there is only one in KC and I am not so sure about it..) so If I have one that long I would end up hitting the tip ever time I tried to chiburi unless I am doing something wrong (let me know on that, I want to do it right but with what resources I have I am pretty sure I am screwing most of it up.)
                    Thanks Guys, and more input is always welcome...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by FundaTW
                      so If I have one that long I would end up hitting the tip ever time I tried to chiburi unless I am doing something wrong (let me know on that, I want to do it right but with what resources I have I am pretty sure I am screwing most of it up.)
                      If I were you, I'd hold off on buying an iaito until you start training at a dojo. All these questions will be answered in time naturally once you have an instructor. If you start practicing by yourself without guidance, you're going to pick up a number of bad habits that are going to be harder to get rid of than if you'd started from scratch. I realize you're probably eager to get started, but I really think it's better to start with a blank slate.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by FundaTW
                        Mr. Mahan,
                        I am just begining to learn, am having to try to figure it out myself, (and before I get my chops busted I looked for a school but there is only one in KC and I am not so sure about it..) so If I have one that long I would end up hitting the tip ever time I tried to chiburi unless I am doing something wrong (let me know on that, I want to do it right but with what resources I have I am pretty sure I am screwing most of it up.)
                        Thanks Guys, and more input is always welcome...
                        Yes, longer swords require principles that are designed around them. I know it sounds like it's been said a million times, but it's just as true now. Find an instructor.

                        At the very least don't sweat whether or not your doing it right or wrong or traditionally if yoru doing it on your own. There really isn't any right or wrong if your making it up, and there is absolutely nothing traditional about self training.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Charles Mahan
                          Just a reminder... This advice would be extremely bad at our dojo. If I did this my iaito would have to be 2 to 3 inches shorter than it is. I don't think I would be allowed to train with something so short. The reason being that without a long sword, it is extremely difficult to ever get saya-biki correct. At least correct to MJER ideals. This is really a question your sensei should answer.
                          Thats why I said it depends on the school. lol

                          Some schools like their blades short, others long, others like I stated above.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X