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  • Iaido Taikai?

    Hi Iaidoka,

    Not doing Iaido (yet), but I am just interested to know what kind of Taikai you lot have for Iaido...?

    It's all Kata.... so what do they base on for judging? The competition format? etc.

    Just curious. Strangely I can't find information on Iaido Taikai at all.

  • #2
    Two guys perform specific kata. Three shimpan judge. That`s it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Iaido Taikai

      The AAU or Amatuer Athletic Union in the United States has sponsored an Iaido Competition the past two years. The rules and regulations for both kata and tameshigiri competition are available at the website for AAU Karate. Go to www.aaukarate.org/ scroll down the home page to rules and regulations and then go to the rules for iaido. The kata used are the ZNKR Seitei kata. Basicially two people get up and do kata one after the other and then three judges pick one or the other and they move on to the next round. Tameshigiri is based on certain cuts, number of cuts and cleaness of cuts.

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      • #4
        I must admit I find taikai for iaido odd, as to me it is not a competitive 'sport' (used the word loosely!) like kendo. I do both for totally different reasons. I know how good my iaido is, and know how good everyone in my association is, so what would be the point? A pat on the back award? No thanks...
        If you want to put yourself under pressure for iaido do embu with everyone watching, or teach with your teachers watching you...
        For me iaido is about a competition with myself to improve, I dont really care about how good I am compared to anyone else.

        Tim Hamilton

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        • #5
          Yes, Mr Hamilton. I can't agree more.
          Just don't understand why such a non-competitive oriented martial art can have Taikai. It's more like putting Taichi moves ("Tou-Lau" so to speak) in the Olympics... gymnastic events...

          On the other hand... I wonder.... why "Group synchronized drawing"? I have seen that in some Enbu video, but why synchronized? Can't stop relating that to synchronized diving!

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          • #6
            how about using stripy hakama and gi, maybe with a bit of Mozart in the background? Oh no, its a karate competition!!!

            Tim Hamilton

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            • #7
              What exactly is embu? I've seen the term quite a few times now, but never with an accompanying explanation.

              c

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              • #8
                its basically where you go out and do a demonstration in front of everyone, examples are at the end of a seminar, a public display such as the Osaka taikai...etc, etc...full reiho plus say 5 to ten waza (depending on your level) in your best kit.

                Tim Hamilton

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                • #9
                  Confound,

                  Ask your teacher to write the kanji for you... the BU bit is BU as in budo.... dont know what the en/em bit is though!

                  I am sure someone is on the forum who knows though....

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                  • #10
                    think of it as a grading... except with more pressure because EVERYONE is watching...

                    Tim Hamilton

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                    • #11
                      Iado Competetive? Synchonized Swords?

                      Guys Iado is not Kendo and Kendo is definitley not Iado. The original basis behind Iado training was quick draw. Be the first person to draw and cut down your openent. This had to have been very critical for the samurai as they often did not just walk around town with their swords drawn. A skilled warrior could start and end a battle with one slice of the blade. So if you were to be just a Kendo practitioner and face a true Samurai you would be dead where you stood as you'd never have the chance to get your sword out of the saya before you were struck down. Also keep in mind that the true masters could strike down several opponents in mere seconds. The opposite is also true you be no go in a all out millitary with out Kendo skills. Point is each have there purpose and go hand in hand. At the same time each have a different application. If you are a Kendo practitioner and have never sliced with a live blade give Iado a try. You will soon find that your swing is more like that of a club than a 3' long knife. Trust me on this contacting a target and actually slicing through it are two different things. A slight mis step or mis-calculation in your slice and you'll find your blade will either skip or slide right off the target or worse a bent blade! A mistake like that would cost you your life in the day of the Samurai. You will find when you truly start to get the feel of actually using a blade you can have a wicked swing in kendo.
                      Last edited by cvgkendo1; 28th October 2003, 12:14 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cvgkendo1
                        Guys Iado is not Kendo and Kendo is definitley not Iado. The original basis behind Iado training was quick draw. Be the first person to draw and cut down your openent. This had to have been very critical for the samurai as they often did not just walk around town with their swords drawn. A skilled warrior could start and end a battle with one slice of the blade. So if you were to be just a Kendo practitioner and face a true Samurai you would be dead where you stood as you'd never have the chance to get your sword out of the saya before you were struck down. Also keep in mind that the true masters could strike down several opponents in mere seconds. The opposite is also true you be no go in a all out millitary with out Kendo skills. Point is each have there purpose and go hand in hand. At the same time each have a different application. If you are a Kendo practitioner and have never sliced with a live blade give Iado a try. You will soon find that your swing is more like that of a club than a 3' long knife. Trust me on this contacting a target and actually slicing through it are two different things. A slight mis step or mis-calculation in your slice and you'll find your blade will either skip or slide right off the target or worse a bent blade! A mistake like that would cost you your life in the day of the Samurai. You will find when you truly start to get the feel of actually using a blade you can have a wicked swing in kendo.
                        And kedo is definetly not iaido. Do not bullshit the bullshitter.
                        Leave the samurais out of contemporary martial arts practise. The last one died many years ago. Honestly.
                        Using a blade, even a shinken, is NOT fighting for your life. The realities of kendo, and iaido, reflects the realities of kendo, and iaido.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          nicely put. Fortunately we are no longer in the position where some nutter with a sword is intent on killing you (unless of course you live near me where its becoming a common occurence in the local nutter community...).
                          I must admit it would be interesting to see the change in approach from experienced kendoka when faced with someone intent on killing you... whats the betting they wouldnt go charging in trying to get the first strike but rely on a counter?

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                          • #14
                            Just don't understand why such a non-competitive oriented martial art can have Taikai. It's more like putting Taichi moves ("Tou-Lau" so to speak) in the Olympics... gymnastic events...

                            While I really do not like to take part in taikai (unless Sensei "tells" me to), from my understanding, the primary purpose now is to help generate interest and get youth to take it up. One of the best ways to do that is to add competition and make it more of a "sport"...(such as with Kendo and Judo). This also helped to "demilitarize" the art so that it was more acceptable in postwar Japan...again, applies to many of the "do"



                            Just my 2 yen.

                            Kris

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by roar
                              And kedo is definetly not iaido. Do not bullshit the bullshitter.
                              Leave the samurais out of contemporary martial arts practise. The last one died many years ago. Honestly.
                              Using a blade, even a shinken, is NOT fighting for your life. The realities of kendo, and iaido, reflects the realities of kendo, and iaido.


                              It seems to me as if that is a pure western thought on kendo and iaido to leave the samurai out of it. Samurai are the historic reasons kendo and iaido came about. They both came about do to the reason of having to use them for diffrent but important aspects of life at that time period. In any martial art history reflects how and why it was used, and how it devoloped over the years. Yes I agree Kendo and Iaido and used for sports aspect only now, but remember and respect where your "sport" came from. Well, thats my thought on the subject.

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