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What is Kobudo?

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  • What is Kobudo?

    What is Kobudo?

  • #2
    Kobudo means old or ancient budo. It refers to a marital art that has not taken on the competitive, sports aspects common today in kendo for example, but has preserved its ancient training methods and philosophy as it gets passed down the generations.

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    • #3
      That's not the common usage. Kobudo usually refers to weapons practice in Okinawan karate. Sai, kami, bo, tonfa, nunchaku - these are kobudo weapons.

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      • #4
        I'll take your word for it Neil. I always assumed it had a similar meaning to koryu, which if I understand correctly is more or less what kendomushi is describing.

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        • #5
          Okay, thanks to you.

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          • #6
            Both terms have the same meaning according to the ZNKR which is as I describe. _That doesn't mean the use as Neil describes it is not also correct.

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            • #7
              Just Google for kobudo, you'll get a bunch of sites referring to Okinawan weapons training. When karate guys say "kobudo", this is what they mean. I haven't heard the other usage of the term which is not to say that it is not also correct.

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              • #8
                Raigma: Check out www.koryu.com for an insight into some of the old school fighting traditions. Meik and Di Skoss have done a fantastic lot of work documenting these traditions for a non-Japanese audience. Di's three books are indispensible for anyone interested in where kendo came from.

                Ironically, while the Skoss' insist on the term "koryu bujutsu" (old school fighting art/s), the national representative bodies in Japan are called (IIRR) the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai and the Nihon Kobudo Shinkokai.

                b

                b

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                • #9
                  It could be different use of the same term or a homonym. There are countless words in japanese that sound exactly the same but have slightly or completely different meanings. Often it depends on either the context or more often the characters used to write it. In the Japanese-English Dictionary of Kendo, they use the characters "ko" (ancient or old) and "budo" (martial discipline).

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                  • #10
                    Okinawan weapons arts? That's news to me

                    I though Kobudo referred to old/classical martial arts in Japan? At least thats why the Nihon Kobudo Shikokai and body I demonstrate for, the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai use this word.

                    Of course Okinawan arts fall in that category but its not because they use weapons. Its because they are old.

                    Hyaku

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                    • #11
                      That's what I thought as well.
                      By the way, the demonstration of koryu kenjutsu shown in the first day of the 50th All Japan was Ittoryu?

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