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A question from a total n00b.

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  • A question from a total n00b.

    Hey, guys. This is actually the first that I've even been in the naginata section here on Kendo World. I've only been doing kendo for six months, and although I have tried to get my wife into it, she is rather uninterested. What she does like the idea of is practicing naginata. The odds of here beginning anytime soon are unlikely (full-time U of M student/mother of two, finishing undergrad this semester), as is the likelyhood of finding a place to train nearby.

    So I was wondering, are there any naginata kata for use against shinai? I figured that if there were something that we could practice together, even if it were just to get her started, then she could at least begin to familiarize herself with the naginata. We are looking into moving to either Ontario or British Columbia, so I figure that the chances of finding a dojo there would be better for her, and she would be more likely to start training if she had a little experience first.

    Anyway, any advice on how she might begin with minimal investment at first would be quite appreciated.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Well, I just realized that the thread just below this is filled with videos demonstrating such naginata/sword kata. I suppose then, what I'm asking about specifically would be what you might recommend as a particularly helpful source for these kata, so that my wife and I could attempt to practice them independent of a sensei.

    Man, I sure sound like a backyardo here. I realize that I also sound like one of those guys who drags his girlfriend to a roleplaying game and just ruins it for everyone. I assure you that this is not the case; she would love to start practicing a martial art, but is overcoming a very stereotypical female upbringing, where she was discouraged from things like this. It seems that historically, naginatajutsu is a good place for her to start.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Kuma View Post
      Well, I just realized that the thread just below this is filled with videos demonstrating such naginata/sword kata. I suppose then, what I'm asking about specifically would be what you might recommend as a particularly helpful source for these kata, so that my wife and I could attempt to practice them independent of a sensei.

      Man, I sure sound like a backyardo here. I realize that I also sound like one of those guys who drags his girlfriend to a roleplaying game and just ruins it for everyone. I assure you that this is not the case; she would love to start practicing a martial art, but is overcoming a very stereotypical female upbringing, where she was discouraged from things like this. It seems that historically, naginatajutsu is a good place for her to start.
      Of course practicing kata that neither of you have any familiarity with (apart from youtuberisation) is well.. potentially pointless as you will pick up bad habits. However I do admire the fact that its more of a bonding thing, id still emphasise and recommend that you both train in Naginata for a while (if possible, of course) before trying independant kata and thus avoiding the picking up of bad habits.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi Bear,
        In most cases involving naginata vs. sword kata, the swordsman is in the role of uchi-dachi, a teaching position, while the person with the naginata is in the role of shi-dachi. This means that uchi-dachi needs to fully understand the naginata side of the kata in order to be on the receiving side as the swordsman.

        I would recommend that your wife spend her time learning about naginata instead. i would start with Alex's book available on this site. You can also get this book:

        Illustrated Naginata: $17.95 pp. See ordering information below.
        This 150 page, soft cover book was originated by the Zen Nihon Naginata Renmei. It is a guide, both for beginners and practicing Naginataka, for preparation, self study, and revision. An easy to follow pictorial type format facilitates understanding. As with any learning process, the guidance of qualified instructors is strongly recommended. http://www.scnf.org/video.html

        Lastly, I would recommend getting this video: http://www.customflix.com/Store/Show....jsp?id=206956

        In the meantime, have you thought about kyudo? A lot of women practice this as well. I think this might be in your area:
        Michigan
        Ann Arbor / Contact: Tina Carter 734 274-1747

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bruce Mitchell View Post
          In the meantime, have you thought about kyudo? A lot of women practice this as well. I think this might be in your area:
          Michigan
          Ann Arbor / Contact: Tina Carter 734 274-1747
          Wow, thanks! My god yes, it's nearby. Like in my backyard, practically. Andi has mentioned how much she would love to do kyudo, but we thought it impractical to find a teacher. I suppose that I never actually looked though. Many thanks.

          Perhaps what I should do about the naginata, is to learn about it myself and then help her when she begins to practice.

          I appreciate all the advice so far. Thanks, guys.

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