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Exemplary Naginata Instructor in Yokohama

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  • Exemplary Naginata Instructor in Yokohama

    Koryu seems to be such a specific word – martial arts of Japan that were created before the inception of the Meiji period. As all our readers know, among the koryu are a number of disciplines, encompassing varying studies from the use of the sword to swimming in armor.
    Another way that koryu should be viewed is quality. Far too many groups are “koryu clubs” - hobby-groups for groups of people seeking to add a little enjoyment and discipline in their lives. We see nothing wrong with that – at the same time, however, we admire most those who strive to practice with the rigor and integrity of our ancestors, who lived and breathed these martial arts. That is why the two of us want to take the opportunity to bring to peoples' awareness a truly wonderful teacher, Seiko Mabuchi, a student of Tendo-ryu naginatajutsu for nearly forty years. Tendo-ryu, of which Meik is a practitioner and Ellis holds in considerable respect, is a ryu with one of the most sophisticated compendia of naginata techniques. In addition to naginata, it has techniques for kusarigama, nitto (two swords), tanto, kaiken and jo (representing a naginata that is broken in the midst of combat).

    Ms. Mabuchi’s dojo is in the Yokohama area, and we urge anyone with a desire to learn a naginata-centered koryu with a truly old-school teacher to seize this opportunity.
    Contact information here

    Best
    Meik Skoss and Ellis Amdur

  • #2
    Thanks gentlemen and welcome to Kendo World. Ellis, I think you must now hold the record for the most considered contributor here: 7 years between joining and your first post. b

    PS - Let this be a reminder to all, you never know just WHO is reading the stuff you write. So make sure it's good!

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    • #3
      I believe that Ms. Mabuchi is a long time student of the exemplary teacher Sawada Hanae, who was herself a student of Mitamura Chiyo. A truly impeccable koryu lineage!

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      • #4
        Huh. "Swimming in armor" is considered a martial art? "I'm a fourth-dan armor swimmer!" Yeah, okay... and what do you do at the Home Depot?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Moonrise View Post
          Huh. "Swimming in armor" is considered a martial art?

          Yes, it is.

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          • #6
            "Suieijutsu" if I am not mistaken.
            I have seen Sawada Hanae sensei on film with a kusarigama I think. She looked really powerful. I really long for the Tendo Ryu seminar this summer

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Moonrise View Post
              Huh. "Swimming in armor" is considered a martial art? "I'm a fourth-dan armor swimmer!" Yeah, okay... and what do you do at the Home Depot?
              Yes, it is. If you can ford a river in armor and come out the other side ready to do battle, you are a far sight ahead of the gent who has to come out naked, dragging his kit.

              A friend, schooled in one of, if not the last traditional martial arts comprehensive school in Japan, pointed out to me that even sewing was considered an ancillary martial art, and was taught as such.

              Traditional armor was held together by silken cords, and would be slashed and damaged during battle. The samurai who could quickly mend his kit, sewing where necessary, would be far ahead of the guys like me, all thumbs. Failing to be able to repair his armor, the poor seamster would be faced with going back into battle with bits either missing or hanging off, in the way.

              Lance Gatling
              Tokyo

              PS - yes, you may be a noob....

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Yonshakujo View Post
                Yes, it is. If you can ford a river in armor and come out the other side ready to do battle, you are a far sight ahead of the gent who has to come out naked, dragging his kit.
                I get that. Honestly. I used to occasionally operate in support of Navy SEAL teams. It's just that the image of a modern person going to the pool with a couple thousand dollars worth of O-Yoroi to practice this particular art seems... odd.

                PS - yes, you may be a noob....
                Oh, sure, notice that!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Moonrise View Post
                  It's just that the image of a modern person going to the pool with a couple thousand dollars worth of O-Yoroi to practice this particular art seems... odd.
                  Not that different from having a thousand dollars bogu being whacked with bamboo sticks several times a week, I think...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Moonrise View Post
                    I get that. Honestly. I used to occasionally operate in support of Navy SEAL teams. It's just that the image of a modern person going to the pool with a couple thousand dollars worth of O-Yoroi to practice this particular art seems... odd.
                    Nobody does that. Just like armored kenjutsu and jujutsu ryuha do 99% of their training in regular keiko-gi and hakama, practitioners of armored swimming ryuha do most of their training in regular swimming suits. The armor is generally broken out at embu, much like the armored kenjutsu and jujutsu ryuha.

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                    • #11
                      It would be a shame if this thread drifted too far, but in the 1980's, I saw a university documentary of a woman in the Machida area, the last in a line of Kiraku-ryu, which she had learned from her husband, a ferociously old-school man born in Taisho. She said that every morning, he would rise at about 4:00 A.M., put on armor, and swim across and back a river near their home. He would then clean and oil the armor. 365 days a year. That's the kind of will that some of our forebears used to have.
                      Which leads me back to Mabuchi sensei . . .

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                      • #12
                        I'm not that familiar with Tendo ryu? How rigorous is the training?

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                        • #13
                          I don't really understand the question. Koryu butjutsu can be physically demanding or not. It can be incredibly psychologically demanding or not. That would depend on the teacher (and the students). I cannot think of any koryu that is more "rigorous" than any other - although the physical demands are different.
                          Ellis Amdur

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                          • #14
                            I meant mentally demanding and generally how broad are the areas of study.

                            Like is there jujutsu... iaijutsu, kenjutsu, as well as naginata, or is all the training merely the naginata and the jo... ?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rjhartu View Post
                              I meant mentally demanding and generally how broad are the areas of study.

                              Like is there jujutsu... iaijutsu, kenjutsu, as well as naginata, or is all the training merely the naginata and the jo... ?
                              [Emphasis mine.]

                              Ouch. Considering you're in the naginata forum, you might want to reword that. And reconsider the concept. Fewer weapons does not mean less rigor in study.

                              Also, not to be flip or anything, but Ellis (and Meik, in absentia) answered your question in the original post.

                              -Beth
                              Last edited by babayaga; 20th May 2010, 08:16 PM. Reason: Clarification

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