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  • Katate

    Are there any single handed attacks with a naginata?

    Coz I'm self taught and practice by way of experimentation I am often left with questions as the results of my actions.

    The reason why I ask is that I find a katate Tsuki from either rightside or leftside chudan to be incredibly effective. Its fast, and because you push with your rear hand the tsuki goes to full extension (when you step and rotate through) and it also pulls back to chudan very easily.
    If your opponent strikes it you know well in advance of thier attack to step out of thier range and into kamae again.

    please correct me if this is wrong, because I do not want a bad habit to form.

    Cheers
    Paulo

  • #2
    some kata of Katori Shinto ryu and Jikishin Kage ryu use one hand strike, but none of them are valid in Atarashii Naginata, as far as I know.

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    • #3
      I believe katate tsuki could get you disqualified in atarashii naginata.
      Because the extended length of the naginata makes it easier to break, which would be dangerous.

      Please tell me if I am mistaken eh

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by emitbrownne
        ....to be incredibly effective. Its fast, and because you push with your rear hand the tsuki goes to full extension
        wouldnt this be highly inaccurate and therefore dangerous?
        i do kendo, and i think tsuki is accurate, but the katate tsuki to be considerably harder to do,
        and i think this difficulty and inaccuracy increases with the length of your weapon, and since the naginata is about 2 m, it would be double as inaccurate,
        especially since u teach yourself,
        i guess as long as u dont practise with partners its ok...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by emitbrownne
          ....to be incredibly effective. Its fast, and because you push with your rear hand the tsuki goes to full extension
          wouldnt this be highly inaccurate and therefore dangerous?
          i do kendo, and i think tsuki is accurate, but the katate tsuki to be considerably harder to do,
          and i think this difficulty and inaccuracy increases with the length of your weapon, and since the naginata is about 2 m, it would be double as inaccurate,
          especially since u teach yourself,
          i guess as long as u dont practise with partners its ok...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mystic_kendoka
            wouldnt this be highly inaccurate and therefore dangerous?
            i do kendo, and i think tsuki is accurate, but the katate tsuki to be considerably harder to do,
            and i think this difficulty and inaccuracy increases with the length of your weapon, and since the naginata is about 2 m, it would be double as inaccurate,
            especially since u teach yourself,
            i guess as long as u dont practise with partners its ok...
            It seems that the katate tsuki is far more accurate than a two handed... maybe thats just me.
            I have practised it on dummies.. walls... posts... and yes opponents. I have only missed once and hit anarea I should not have... and that was because it was deflected hard as it came in.

            I'm not bragging or anything like that, I'm here trying to learn...
            if it is deemed dangerous/illegal/stoopid then I'll stop... it just seemed to work.

            Comment


            • #7
              Without a "guiding" hand in sparring I would *think* you might loose the fine grain control neccessary to make the adjustments to a rapidly moving target and thence hit "badly". My sensei emphasises the front hand is for control (not power).

              Looking at it from another angle, have you done kata #5? Unless you have really strong wrists the ebu strike to your one-handed naginata is going to put you at a severe disadvantage.

              Comment


              • #8
                Have you ever harai-ed a tsuki? With two hands the naginata flys off to the side; I imagine katate waza would not only be weak but hard to control. The nice thing about the naginata is you don't have to worry about reach.... unless your footwork is bad. STUDY STUDY STUDY
                Besides when you finish a tsuki properly your back hand should be right in front of your "plumbing".

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by alepto
                  Without a "guiding" hand in sparring I would *think* you might loose the fine grain control neccessary to make the adjustments to a rapidly moving target and thence hit "badly". My sensei emphasises the front hand is for control (not power).

                  Looking at it from another angle, have you done kata #5? Unless you have really strong wrists the ebu strike to your one-handed naginata is going to put you at a severe disadvantage.
                  No Kata.. no Teacher... its quite sad really.

                  I use the back hand for power, just as you would use the lower hand for power with a shinai.
                  On the Katate I use the back hand to extend the extra distance.

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                  • #10
                    what is your purpose in studying naginata?

                    self-defence (in which case the unsafer for your opponent the better)
                    hobby/entertainment (nothing matters as long as its fun)
                    sport (as long as it works for you)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mystic_kendoka
                      what is your purpose in studying naginata?

                      self-defence (in which case the unsafer for your opponent the better)
                      hobby/entertainment (nothing matters as long as its fun)
                      sport (as long as it works for you)
                      To try and improve, with the limited resources that are available to me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mystic_kendoka
                        what is your purpose in studying naginata?

                        self-defence (in which case the unsafer for your opponent the better)
                        hobby/entertainment (nothing matters as long as its fun)
                        sport (as long as it works for you)
                        Why do you ask?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          just curious, by improve do you mean to improve yourself?

                          i do kendo, and i 'try and improve' but my PURPOSE is as a sport and hobby,

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Any and all activities improve oneself... but I'm referring to becoming better at weilding a Naginata.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              but you're not answering my question, you are saying 'you are doing naginata do be better at it' what i mean to ask is, why do you want to be better at it? common interest/curiosity, sport, leisure, self-defence?

                              Comment

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