This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The Nuts & Bolts of Kendo

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series The Nuts & Bolts of KendoThe Nuts & Bolts of Kendo — Kote Waza By Hanshi 9th Dan Nakano Yasoji — Translated by Alex Bennett First published in Kendo World 1.4, 2002 *** Points to observe As can be seen in the kendo kata, kote strikes can be big or small. What particular points should be given attention to when making a kote attack? This is just my opinion, but I don’t think that a kote attack should be made from a distance further away than that of a men attack. It would be differentRead More →

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Kendo Clinic

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Kendo ClinicKendo Clinic articles are intended as an educational forum only. The articles presented offer only a limited over-view of the great number of possible ailments and their variations. Articles are based on documented medical practices; use established terminology and are intended to provide the reader with the information needed to engage in consultation with medical professionals. The authors of Kendo Clinic and the editors of Kendo World stress that the information offered in these articles should under no circumstances be used for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. Persons suffering from any injuries or ailments are urgedRead More →

By Steve Kelsey. When you study jukendo you learn the importance of attack, nearly everything you do is aimed at delivering a powerful, focused attacking thrust, and this is generally accompanied with a forward leap. The forward leap adds power to the thrust and also enables the attacker to enter past and inside the defender’s guard. The first line of defence from these thrusts is this guard or kamae; this is supplanted with parries, deflections and interestingly enough retreat. This tactical retreat when timed perfectly can break the attacker’s rhythm and balance, allowing for effective counter attack. Watching jukendo shiai one sees a great dealRead More →

naginata kata

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Naginatado Kihon Dohsa

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Naginatado Kihon DohsaBy Baptiste Tavernier Originally published in Kendo World 6.3, 2012.   Naginatadō Kihon Dōsa (a.k.a. Butokukai Seitei Kata) At the beginning of each kata, shidachi (naginata) and uketachi (tachi) should start from chūdan, and then assume the designated kamae. At the end of each kata, both should first assume chūdan again, then go back to the original position assuming migi-kowaki (mugamae in modern naginata) for shidachi and lowering the kensen for uketachi.   Ippon-me – Jodan (1) SHIDACHI: assume jōdan, from the back foot take two steps forward into the correct maai. (1) UKETACHI: assume chūdanRead More →