This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Naginatado Kihon Dohsa

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Naginatado Kihon DohsaBy Baptiste Tavernier Originally published in Kendo World 6.3, 2012.   Introduction In 1941 the Dai Nippon Butokukai published a set of generic kata and teaching guidelines entitled Naginata-dō Kihon Dōsa, for the purpose of promoting a unified form of naginata in schools, as it had already been the case with kendo in 1906 (Dai-Nippon Butokukai Seitei Kenjutsu Kata – for more information refer to Kendo World 5.2, pp. 29-38). Naginata was admited in girls schools since 1913 as an extracurricular activity and was furthemore elevated to an elective subject from 1937. However, naginataRead More →

naginata kata

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Naginatado Kihon Dohsa

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Naginatado Kihon DohsaBy Baptiste Tavernier Originally published in Kendo World 6.3, 2012.   Naginatadō Kihon Dōsa (a.k.a. Butokukai Seitei Kata) At the beginning of each kata, shidachi (naginata) and uketachi (tachi) should start from chūdan, and then assume the designated kamae. At the end of each kata, both should first assume chūdan again, then go back to the original position assuming migi-kowaki (mugamae in modern naginata) for shidachi and lowering the kensen for uketachi.   Ippon-me – Jodan (1) SHIDACHI: assume jōdan, from the back foot take two steps forward into the correct maai. (1) UKETACHI: assume chūdanRead More →