This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series The Nuts & Bolts of Kendo

The Nuts & Bolts of Kendo — Men Waza By Hanshi 9th Dan Nakano Yasoji — Translated by Alex Bennett First published in Kendo World 1.3, 2002   Striking Targets (datotsubui) Q: In kendo, the target areas are men, kote, do, and tsuki. How were these particular targets decided upon? In the old days of mortal combat, warriors were particularly careful about protecting volatile areas like the head and arms. In kendo we are not aiming to strike these ‘target’ areas on the bogu per se , but are really attempting to cut these critical areas on the body, which in a real combat situationRead More →

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series The Nuts & Bolts of Kendo

The Nuts & Bolts of Kendo — Kote Waza By Hanshi 9th Dan Nakano Yasoji — Translated by Alex Bennett First published in Kendo World 1.4, 2002 *** Points to observe As can be seen in the kendo kata, kote strikes can be big or small. What particular points should be given attention to when making a kote attack? This is just my opinion, but I don’t think that a kote attack should be made from a distance further away than that of a men attack. It would be different if the opponent’s shinai was completely immobilised, or there was an obvious opening, but otherRead More →

This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series The Nuts & Bolts of Kendo

The Nuts & Bolts of Kendo — Doh Waza By Hanshi 9th Dan Nakano Yasoji — Translated by Alex Bennett First published in Kendo World 1.4, 2002 *** Points to observe What should you do with your left hand when striking doh? You should move it up near the right hand, but not the whole way up. Your left hand shouldn’t actually touch your right. What should we be careful of when teaching doh and gyaku-doh? A lot of people prefer not to hit do at all. I remember one sensei who never taught his students doh, but made them concentrate solely on men andRead More →